Minnesota


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Searching the internet for the best and most exciting news and events in our community left me feeling very sad. With multiple tabs opened of websites from different local news reporting sources, all I could find were the negatives. Majority of the news that popped up were the major reports that involved the whole country or the really big negative events in Minnesota. There weren’t much recognition to the positive things happening in our community. Reading about so many things happening made me feel many different emotions; sad, mad, scared, helpless, etc. I had to search else where for community news and events that showed the exciting and fun community Minnesota also has, other than all of the bad that does occur in other states too.

Realizing that even though I was overwhelmed with negative emotions, this was something to learn from. From all of the sad and negative news, we should definitely be aware and keep at the back of our mind to be prepared and safe from danger. Also, just because all we see may be negative things, that doesn’t mean there is no positivity or light at all.

Overall, negative news and what is happening right now is definitely something to keep up with so we can be aware. I am not trying to say that we need less negative news; in the end, it would just be nicer to also have more reports on the positive local community. For example, North Minneapolis has so many businesses, organizations, stores, and people trying to make it a better place for everyone. They offer so many opportunities to their local neighbors and even outsiders. I was able to have the opportunity to walk around the Northside and interview a couple of businesses and organizations. There are so many good things happening but no one really talks about them.

Minnesota is so vibrant and has such a great sense of community connection wherever you go. The diversity, community, nature, food, nightlife, families, etc. There are so many things to look forward to in Minnesota and I’m so thankful to be able to call it my home. I feel like we have to remember to look for the positive things and not let the negatives take over completely. Be aware and know but also spread positivity.  

A Reminder To Be One With The Community

After reading the article titled “The Center for Native and Pacific Health Disparities Research Walks Beside, Not In Front of, Diverse Hawaiian Communities to Control Diabetes,” it made me think about the good point that Dr. Marjorie Mau, a lead principal investigator of the Center for Native and Pacific Health Disparities Research, addressed on how they walk beside the community rather than in front of them. When trying to help the community, I think that it is best to make them feel like family; to feel comfortable and at ease with you. With the information we get about health issues in our communities, it definitely makes us want to address it and help those who may need some guidance. With this, we have to also remember that we can not just try to budge into their lives and take over, even if it is for good intentions.

The article mentioned how the Partnership for Improving Lifestyle Interventions (PILI) project addressed obesity by adapting an existing weight loss education program. They used local languages and examples that were relevant to those in the community. There was also a program added to help participants with the support of family members and the community; this program was culturally adapted based on its community. Personally, I have never thought about letting myself be apart of a research. The whole concept of trying to improve health by researching is amazing but when I think about allowing research programs work on my body, it just doesn’t sound too pleasing, depending on what it is. So after reading this article, I realized that maybe it isn’t too bad. Also, I loved how the research program approached the topic of research and what they were focusing on. Without a doubt, I think that their approach/idea on research and community can be applied to other things.

Dr. Mau and the Center for Native and Pacific Health Disparities Research definitely has good intentions to help the communities, mainly focused in Hawaii. The overall thought of walking besides them/the community and helping with issues they/the community care about can definitely help with the factor of gaining trust and opening up for help/guidance. Since our goal for the concept of Bicultural Healthy Living is to help support people in living healthily within cultures people adapt to, applying these ideas and strategies will greatly benefit the community and our goal.

Remember to lend out a helping hand but also remember to think about who those you help are as a person. Diversity is all around us but sometimes we forget that we live in a world where every culture is different but it is normal. Every community may be different so it is important to help with things that matter to them while making them feel like family.

 

 

To read more about the article, “The Center for Native and Pacific Health Disparities Research Walks Beside, Not In Front of, Diverse Hawaiian Communities to Control Diabetes,” click the link: https://www.nimhd.nih.gov/news-events/features/community-health/diabetes-risk-and-native-hawaiians.html

Be Active!

Asian Media Access is celebrating the many health benefits of outdoor parks and recreation activities in honor of July’s National Park and Recreation Month. National Park and Recreation Month highlights the important role local parks and recreation activities play in keeping our community(ies) strong and healthy. During the month of July we encourage people of all ages to get active outdoors!

Children with access to safe parks are more likely to be physically active — and active kids perform better in school. For people of all ages, physical activity can reduce the chances of becoming obese. Plus, spending time outdoors can improve mental health. Visit Discover the Forest, https://www.discovertheforest.org/?m=1, to search for a forest or park near you!

Keep up with our Facebook page, Bicultural Active Living Lifestyle, to stay updated on some of the latest events in the Minneapolis/Saint Paul Community. Also check out our Bicultural Active Living Lifestyle (BALL) webpage, http://ballequity.amamedia.org/, for more events and coverage. Together we can get our community(ies) to all the great programs that our public parks and recreational facilities offer.

For more information on our events or just more about us,
email us at amamedia@amamedia.org
or call us at (612)376-7715

American Heart Month

http://news.heart.org/

“Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. Every year, 1 in 4 deaths are caused by heart disease.

The good news? Heart disease can often be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage their health conditions. Communities, health professionals, and families can work together to create opportunities for people to make healthier choices.

Make a difference in your community: Spread the word about strategies for preventing heart disease and encourage people to live heart healthy lives.” – https://healthfinder.gov/

What can you do to spread awareness?

  • Share about American Heart Month on your social media platforms, with friends, and families
  • Take action: Be the cure! External Links Disclaimer Logo Join the American Heart Association’s national movement in support of healthier communities and healthier lives.” – https://healthfinder.gov/
  • Join or host community event on finding local resources to live more healthy
    • Local clinics
    • Local fresh, organic, and affordable food options
    • Community parks, clubs, gyms, etc.

Public Health: Preventing Suicide

Suicide is a serious concern in the US and it is becoming more common in modern times. The feelings of being stressed, going through depression, or being pressured from outside forces can take a toll on people. So what can we as a society and individuals do to prevent suicide from occurring?

  1. Change the negative perception of those with mental illnesses, disorders, and substance abuse. Often times, people are too embarrassed or ashamed to get help and it could be that they don’t want their problems to be known or allow it to bother other people. “But talking, being open, and making connections with mental health services can make the difference between life and death. Research has uncovered warning signs for suicide. Learn warning signs from SAMHSA’s Suicide Prevention Resource Center exit disclaimer icon and an easy-to-remember warning signs mnemonic from American Association of Suicidology. exit disclaimer icon” – http://www.hhs.gov/
  2. Use public services that are available and always confidential. Rely on your local clinic or go see a therapist to help you or your friend out. Talking about one’s thoughts and feelings can help them organize themselves in terms of how to deal with difficult situations. It’s not easy to open up about sensitive topics but allowing someone in to help and guide them is a step towards a positive direction.
  3. Acknowledge that suicide is preventable. Let’s talk honestly about this difficult issue, use broad collaborative approaches to address the problem, and do all we can to learn more about how to prevent suicide. Help get the message out.

    If you or someone you know needs help, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline exit disclaimer icon (1-800-273-TALK/8255). Last year the Lifeline connected 1.5 million callers with counselors in their local area. Through a network of more than 160 community crisis centers, the Lifeline also offers specialized support to veterans, Spanish speakers and online users.

Facts:

  • Each year there are more than 40,000 suicides in the US – an average of about 117 every day.
  • Rates of suicide have increased by 28 percent since 2000, and it is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States.
  • Every year some 1.1 million adults attempt suicide and about 470,000 people are treated in U.S. emergency departments for nonfatal, self-inflicted injuries.

Statistics and other information is link here!

 

National Health Education Week (Oct 17-21)

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“Sponsored by the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE), National Health Education Week (NHEW) is celebrated during the third full week of October. This celebration brings national attention to public health issues and promotes consumers’ understanding of the role of health education and health promotion in society.

Celebrate this week with us as we focus on partnerships to build community health. ” – https://www.sophe.org/

What is the goal of National Health Education Week?

  • Spread awareness and knowledge of health care cost, healthy behaviors, and health programs to communities and schools.
  • To highlight the accomplishments and efforts of organizations towards public health.
  • To share health advises between professionals, the government, and between the people.
  • To continue to improve health education and other health conditions.

Click here for more info on day to day participation!

World Food Day – Oct 16, 2016

World Food Day is a day of action against hunger. On October 16, people around the world come together to declare their commitment to eradicate hunger in our lifetime. Because when it comes to hunger, the only acceptable number in the world is zero.” – http://www.worldfooddayusa.org/

What can you to take part of this event?

  • Donate food at your local food shelf. Or perhaps a start a food drive yourself!
  • Volunteer at your local organization (food bank, food self, community center) that may offer food donation to the local community.
  • The theme this year is changing climate. We want to educate people on how our farmers/fishers are being impacted by the climate change on a global scale. In order to feed the growing population, we need to find better ways to produce food on a smaller scale and using eco-friendly alternative. “This is why our global message for World Food Day 2016 is “Climate is changing. Food and agriculture must too.” – http://www.fao.org/ 

Look down below for statistics on hunger:

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Accredited to worldfooddayusa