Food Safety


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It is that time of the year again! Summer has finally arrived! It is time for outdoorsy fun with the ones you love. This also means continuing being safe wherever you go and in whatever you do. This week’s post will be on some safety facts about grilling, from the Minnesota Department of Health.

Handle Food Safely

  • Always wash your hands before and after handling food.
  • Keep the kitchen, dishes and utensils clean.
  • Always serve food on clean plates.
  • Harmful bacteria present in raw meat and poultry and their juices can contaminate safely cooked food. To prevent food borne illness, don’t use the same platter and utensils for raw and cooked meat/poultry.

Keep Hot Foods HOT, Cold Foods COLD

  • Keep meat and poultry refrigerated until ready to use.
  • After cooking meat and poultry on the grill, keep it at 140°F or warmer until served. Keep cooked meats hot by setting them to the side of the grill rack. Cooked meat can be kept hot in a warm oven (approximately 200°F), in a chafing dish, or on a warming tray.
  • In hot weather (above 90°F), food should never sit out for more than one hour.
  • Refrigerate any leftovers promptly in shallow containers.

Marinating

  • Marinate to tenderize or add flavor.
  • Marinate food in the refrigerator, not on the counter.
  • If marinades are to be used as a sauce for the cooked meat, either reserve a portion of the marinade before putting raw meat and poultry in it, or boil it before using on cooked meat to destroy any harmful bacteria.

Precooking
Precooking food on a stove is a good way to reduce grilling time. Make sure that the food goes immediately on the preheated grill to complete cooking.

Cook Thoroughly
Fresh and frozen raw meat, poultry and fish should be cooked hot enough to kill the bacteria, parasites and viruses that may be in the product. The temperatures shown below are recommended for home preparation of food. Always use a meat thermometer to check temperatures. Color is not a reliable indicator of doneness.

Reheating
When reheating fully cooked meats, grill to 165°F.

 

FOOD SAFE INTERNAL TEMPERATURE *
Poultry or fowl, whole or parts 165°F
Ground poultry or fowl 165°F
Ground beef, veal, pork, lamb or venison 160°F
Fresh beef, veal, pork, lamb or venison 145°F
Fish and shellfish, all kinds 145°F
Eggs Until yolk and white are firm
Egg dishes 160°F

* Regulated facilities may cook to different temperatures because staff are trained in the use of time and temperature to reach safe standards.

 

For additional information on food safety, visit the link listed

http://www.health.state.mn.us/foodsafety/index.html

 

 

Information received from the Minnesota Health Department. To view the PDF, click on the link provided below.
http://www.health.state.mn.us/foodsafety/cook/grill.pdf

Helping Health Now


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Article written by Kenza Moller talks about how the measles outbreak in Minnesota has risen. There were 70 confirmed cases in the United States, year 2016. Now having that number in mind, try guessing Minnesota’s confirmed cases so far this year… Alone, it has reached 73 confirmed cases (in Minnesota, year 2017). Pretty surprising for sure! This was shocking news to me, showing how dangerously fast it has spread, and remember, this is only counting Minnesota’s cases.

Measles is a contagious disease that can lead to pneumonia, deafness, hospitalization, and death, according to the article and it’s reference. There were at least 65 of the people with measles in Minnesota that were not vaccinated. Due to the rise of anti-vaccination movement, it has increased the chances and risks of diseases spreading faster and coming back throughout. The outbreak began about 8 weeks ago and about 21 people have been hospitalized.

Getting vaccinated can prevent spread and help a person from contracting the measles. If a person contracts this disease, there is not much to do except the hospitals trying their best because there is really no way to treat it.

I feel like the world is getting more and more dangerous due to new diseases, infections, bacteria…etc. It’s so important to keep up with what is currently spreading and how a person can prevent them from harm. People may think that it will never happen to them but that is how it all happens, when off guard and not taking precautions. I am constantly worried about new spreads and how they will hurt the ones I love.

Overall, do your studies and keep up with the news. Make sure you are taking action in preventing you and your loved ones from contracting these new diseases and everything else.

For more information on measles, visit pages listed:

Received information in article from https://www.romper.com/p/measles-outbreak-in-minnesota-is-the-biggest-in-years-illustrates-a-dangerous-trend-62010

Simple Tips to Be Happier!

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Life can be stressful sometimes where we forget take care of our mind and body. It’s important to always take some time to slow and process what we are going through; whether it is good or bad things. Here are some tips on how you can be happier:

  • Worry less, start doing more! The first steps to do anything is always a challenge, especially if it is out of our comfort zone. Make a list of steps or mini goals to reach your ultimate goal. Try to follow through with by making small actions every day to help you start doing more.
  • Chill your mind! Overthinking won’t do you any good if you don’t break things down into simpler thoughts and see the bigger picture. Whatever that is bothering, ask yourself these questions:
    • How important is it? Is it affecting you in a positive or negative way?
    • Would you prefer talking to somebody about it? If not, writing it down? Put ideas and thoughts onto tangible things if it helps you declutter your thoughts.
  • Exercise can help! Exercise has been studied and shown that it helps reduce stress in your body. Not only is it good to keep up a exercise routine, it also help with your mental health by releasing happy brain chemicals that makes you feel better. After a work out, you’ll feel a lot better than you did before.
  • You’re not in it alone! Tons of people are probably going through similar problems or challenges as you. Take the time to reach out to your social network and resources. Don’t forget that you are not alone and there are always people are willing to be a help and listening pal.

National Park Week and National ParkRx Day

National Park Week is America’s largest celebration of national heritage. It’s about making great connections, exploring amazing places, discovering open spaces, enjoying affordable vacations, and enhancing America’s best idea—the national parks! It’s all happening in your national parks. The National Park Service is once again partnering with the National Park Foundation, the official charity of America’s national parks, to present National Park Week from April 15 to 23, 2017.

Plan your visit by what you want to do or where you want to go. Here are some highlights during National Park Week:

  • April 15–16 and 22–23: Visit for free!
    On these National Park Week weekends, every national park will give you free admission!
  • April 15: Junior Ranger Day
    Calling kids of all ages! Earn a Junior Ranger badge at one of the many fun programs happening at parks across the country.
  • April 22: Earth Day
    Join a volunteer project or simply enjoy the natural wonders and wildlife preserved in national parks.
  • April 23: Park Rx Day
    Get healthy and active in a national park with a ranger-led program or with family and friends. Learn more about Park Rx Day.
  • April 23: Volunteer Recognition Day
    Find volunteer opportunities at a national park. If you are a current volunteer, share your story of why you volunteer and be recognized on social media. Learn more about Volunteer Recognition Day.
Try something new this year. Find your park!

Click on links down for more info!

Info belong to https://www.nps.gov/.

March is National Nutrition Month

National Nutrition Month® is a nutrition education and information campaign created annually in March by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The campaign focuses on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits. In addition, National Nutrition Month® promotes the Academy and its members to the public and the media as the most valuable and credible source of timely, scientifically-based food and nutrition information.

http://www.eatright.org/

History

Initiated in March 1973 as a week-long event, “National Nutrition Week” became a month-long observance in 1980 in response to growing public interest in nutrition. Read more in the article, “National Nutrition Month: A Brief History.”

Themes of the New Millennium

With the first “National Nutrition Week” in 1973, it was embraced by members of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics as a way to deliver nutrition education messages to the public while promoting the profession of dietetics. In 1980, the week-long celebration expanded to become National Nutrition Month®. Over the years, the theme has reflected trends and culture of the time, but has always remained true to its original purpose: “To increase the public’s awareness of the importance of good nutrition and position Academy members as the authorities in nutrition.”

2000

Food and Fitness: Health for a Lifetime

2009

Eat Right!

2001

Food and Fitness: Build a Healthy Lifestyle

2010

Nutrition From the Ground Up

2002

Start Today for a Healthy Tomorrow

2011

Eat Right with Color

2003

Healthy Eating, Healthy You

2012

Get Your Plate in Shape

2004

Eat Smart — Stay Healthy

2013

Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day

2005

Get a Taste for Nutrition

2014

Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right

2006

Step Up to Nutrition and Health

2015

Bite Into A Healthy Lifestyle

2007

100% Fad Free

2016

Savor the Flavor of Eating Right

2008

Nutrition: It’s a Matter or Fact

Information provided by http://www.eatright.org/.

International Women’s Day

https://www.internationalwomensday.com/

“International Women’s Day celebrates the social, economic, cultural and political achievement of women. Yet progress has slowed in many places across the world, so global action is needed to accelerate gender parity. In 2016 leaders across the world pledged to take action as champions of gender parity – not only for International Women’s Day, but for every day. Groups and individuals also pledged their support.

For International Women’s Day 2017, we’re asking you to #BeBoldForChange.
Call on the masses or call on yourself to help forge a better working world – a more gender inclusive world. Submit your #BeBoldForChange action via the IWD website.” – https://www.internationalwomensday.com/

The goal is to have everyone, of all backgrounds, both men and women to support this day to showcase the world moving towards a positive direction that ensures equality among all women and men. To name a new things that needs change are equality in wages, education, healthcare, and other opportunities that are limited to women. It may not be the biggest concern in the US, but in other parts of the world these things aren’t available to young girls and women. In support of International Women’s Day, let’s highlight some historical female leaders from all around the world.

Lee Tai-Young was the first official female judge and lawyer in Korea.

Miriam Makeba was a South African leader, singer, actress, and civil rights activist.

Rukmini Devi Arundale was a choreographer, animal activist, dancer, and pioneer of traditional dancing.

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Trends in Obesity Among Early Age Children

CDC

Obesity is a present health concern in the US and it’s important that it is continued to be discussed about. In order to prevent and decrease obesity rates in the US, there have been many attempts and programs to help people better understand what causes obesity, how to prevent it, and the ways we can educate people on it.

Some quick facts from a research conducted by CDC:

“Childhood obesity is associated with negative health consequences in childhood (1) that continue into adulthood (2), putting adults at risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain cancers (1). Obesity disproportionately affects children from low-income families (3).

Overall obesity prevalence increased from 14.0% in 2000 to 15.5% in 2004 and 15.9% in 2010, and then decreased to 14.5% in 2014. During 2010–2014, the prevalence of obesity decreased significantly overall, among non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, American Indian/Alaska Natives and Asians/Pacific Islanders, and among 34 (61%) of the 56 WIC state agencies in states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories.” – CDC

Who is generally at risk for obesity:

  • Low-income families
  • Young mothers
  • People without access to healthy food/alternative food options

What can we do to prevent obesity?

  • Spread the knowledge of obesity among friends, families, peers, co-workers, etc. through various use of communications and social media platforms
  • Encourage people to live a active, balance, and healthier lifestyle by:
    • Encouraging healthy habits
    • Participating in activities outside of home/schools/work environment
    • Buying produces at local markets/groceries or partaking in a community garden or growing your own produces
    • Using other methods of transportation such as walking, biking, skating, etc.

Find recommended resources for minorities here.

Community Efforts Towards Healthier Living

“Community efforts across the country are improving the health of more people by working with groups that include public health professionals, hospitals, local community members, and more.

By Nolan Ly

A lack of access to healthy living opportunities in communities can affect obesity and other preventable chronic diseases. Learn more about community efforts to support healthy eating and active living: http://bit.ly/2knQTvl” – https://www.cdc.gov/

What are the benefits to a active community?

  • Reduce pollution and trash to the environment
  • Provide social and economic opportunities for the people of the community to collaborate and develop better relationships
  • Support social cohesion, events, and activities

What can you do to take part:

  • Going out to explore and enjoy the community by walking, biking, via other outdoor activities etc., either with yourself, friends, or family members.
  • Volunteering at a community garden to help grow veggies/fruits for the community and learning more about gardening along the way.
  • Educate your family, friends, and yourself on recycling, the benefits to it, and how it’s a little step towards making the Earth cleaner.
  • Volunteer for local parks and recreation centers to support and spread awareness for environmental concerns.

Being a Flexible Planner

Things don’t always go according to plan and it could be upsetting. Whether you’re an organized person or not, we all hope that the plans we make could go accordingly and smoothly. The key to counter this is by thinking about possible alternatives, keeping a open mind, and understanding that it is not the end of the world. Here are some tips to help you be a flexible planner:

  1. Keep track of things. Set up reminders, write things down, or use a calendar to help you keep track of small to big events, goals, or dreams. It helps you the most when you take steps to motivate yourself.
  2. Make back up plans. Ask yourself what you plan to next do next if your initial plan doesn’t work out. Although you may end up getting sidetracked to point b instead of point a, just know that it can be a new opportunity for you to do something else.
  3. Throw away your feelings of dejection/rejection. It doesn’t mean that you are left with no options, in fact, there’s too many options out there in the world today. Take the time to reevaluate your situation and think about what is it that you really want to do or achieve. If you’re over/under qualified for something, seek better opportunities suited for you or seek out opportunities to improve areas in which you can work on.
  4. Being flexible means you’re open to new things. Don’t be too strict on yourself in life or refrain yourself from experiencing that you’re not used to. Even if the experience was positive/negative, you have least learn something and gain new information. Also keep in mind that it is your perspective that will influence your experiences in life and to be self-aware of your own thought process.