Helping Health Now


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Article written by Kenza Moller talks about how the measles outbreak in Minnesota has risen. There were 70 confirmed cases in the United States, year 2016. Now having that number in mind, try guessing Minnesota’s confirmed cases so far this year… Alone, it has reached 73 confirmed cases (in Minnesota, year 2017). Pretty surprising for sure! This was shocking news to me, showing how dangerously fast it has spread, and remember, this is only counting Minnesota’s cases.

Measles is a contagious disease that can lead to pneumonia, deafness, hospitalization, and death, according to the article and it’s reference. There were at least 65 of the people with measles in Minnesota that were not vaccinated. Due to the rise of anti-vaccination movement, it has increased the chances and risks of diseases spreading faster and coming back throughout. The outbreak began about 8 weeks ago and about 21 people have been hospitalized.

Getting vaccinated can prevent spread and help a person from contracting the measles. If a person contracts this disease, there is not much to do except the hospitals trying their best because there is really no way to treat it.

I feel like the world is getting more and more dangerous due to new diseases, infections, bacteria…etc. It’s so important to keep up with what is currently spreading and how a person can prevent them from harm. People may think that it will never happen to them but that is how it all happens, when off guard and not taking precautions. I am constantly worried about new spreads and how they will hurt the ones I love.

Overall, do your studies and keep up with the news. Make sure you are taking action in preventing you and your loved ones from contracting these new diseases and everything else.

For more information on measles, visit pages listed:

Received information in article from https://www.romper.com/p/measles-outbreak-in-minnesota-is-the-biggest-in-years-illustrates-a-dangerous-trend-62010

Talking to Teens About Alcohol

It’s important to discuss about the topic of alcohol usage and influences among teens. Whether it may be from their parents, schools, peers, friends, and so on. It’s matter of helping teenagers to develop better decision skills and to make decisions based on what they want. Why do we care? Because we want teens to know the risks of early alcohol use and how it can affect them.

So what are some reasons why teens drink?

  • Social events and social peer pressure
  • Mental, behavior, school, and/or problems at home
  • History of abuse or trauma

What are the consequences of early drinking?

  • Possibility of increased related problems
  • Alcohol-related accidents
  • Higher risk of engaging in:
    • Sexual activity
    • Violent Crime
    • Alcoholism

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Minnesota’s Number 3 in US State Ranking

Minnesota welcomes you sign at the state border

mnlyme.org

ST. PAUL, MN – Citing economic opportunities, great educations, and quality health care in Minnesota, U.S. News and World Report today released a study ranking Minnesota the 3rd-best state in the nation. The study also ranked Minnesota as the best state in the region, when compared to North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, and Missouri.

“This ranking affirms what we already know: we live in one of the very best states in the country,” said Governor Mark Dayton. “But we still have more work to do to ensure that Minnesota is a state that works for everyone. I urge the Legislature to join me in making the investments necessary to ensure that our state remains a national leader in education, health care, modern infrastructure, and other essential elements of economic opportunity for all our citizens.”
 
Among the categories considered in the study, Minnesota scored top rankings in opportunity, health care, infrastructure, education, and the economy. In every category scored, Minnesota beats the average of all states in the nation. The study notes that Minnesota has “the third-best health care and some of the best infrastructure and opportunity in the nation.”
 
“This study underscores that investments in education and infrastructure drive opportunities for all Minnesotans, everywhere in our state,” said Lt. Governor Tina Smith. “Governor Dayton’s Opportunity Agenda will continue this progress.”
 
Since Governor Dayton took office, the state has turned a $6 billion deficit into consistent budget surpluses, paid back $2.8 billion in debt to our schools, and added more than 255,400 jobs. Under the Governor’s leadership, the state has made investments in education every year – no excuses, no exceptions – to grow greater opportunity for all Minnesota families. Governor Dayton is now calling for An Opportunity Agenda for a Better Minnesota, to continue that progress and make Minnesota a state that works for everyone, everywhere in our state.
 
Minnesota’s Number 3 Best State Ranking
In addition to Minnesota’s national number 3 best state ranking, the study also ranked Minnesota as the number 1 state in the region, which also includes North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, and Missouri. Below, see Minnesota’s rankings in the different categories studied.
 
Category
National Ranking
Regional Ranking
Opportunity
2
1
Education
3
1
Infrastructure
5
1
Health Care
3
1
Economy
12
2
Crime and Corrections
17
3
Government Administration
24
5
 
In the study, Minnesota also ranked #1 nationally for Labor Force Participation, #4 for Educational Attainment, and #5 for Medicare Quality. Additional information is available on the U.S. News and World Report website.
 
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International Women’s Day

https://www.internationalwomensday.com/

“International Women’s Day celebrates the social, economic, cultural and political achievement of women. Yet progress has slowed in many places across the world, so global action is needed to accelerate gender parity. In 2016 leaders across the world pledged to take action as champions of gender parity – not only for International Women’s Day, but for every day. Groups and individuals also pledged their support.

For International Women’s Day 2017, we’re asking you to #BeBoldForChange.
Call on the masses or call on yourself to help forge a better working world – a more gender inclusive world. Submit your #BeBoldForChange action via the IWD website.” – https://www.internationalwomensday.com/

The goal is to have everyone, of all backgrounds, both men and women to support this day to showcase the world moving towards a positive direction that ensures equality among all women and men. To name a new things that needs change are equality in wages, education, healthcare, and other opportunities that are limited to women. It may not be the biggest concern in the US, but in other parts of the world these things aren’t available to young girls and women. In support of International Women’s Day, let’s highlight some historical female leaders from all around the world.

Lee Tai-Young was the first official female judge and lawyer in Korea.

Miriam Makeba was a South African leader, singer, actress, and civil rights activist.

Rukmini Devi Arundale was a choreographer, animal activist, dancer, and pioneer of traditional dancing.

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Trends in Obesity Among Early Age Children

CDC

Obesity is a present health concern in the US and it’s important that it is continued to be discussed about. In order to prevent and decrease obesity rates in the US, there have been many attempts and programs to help people better understand what causes obesity, how to prevent it, and the ways we can educate people on it.

Some quick facts from a research conducted by CDC:

“Childhood obesity is associated with negative health consequences in childhood (1) that continue into adulthood (2), putting adults at risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain cancers (1). Obesity disproportionately affects children from low-income families (3).

Overall obesity prevalence increased from 14.0% in 2000 to 15.5% in 2004 and 15.9% in 2010, and then decreased to 14.5% in 2014. During 2010–2014, the prevalence of obesity decreased significantly overall, among non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, American Indian/Alaska Natives and Asians/Pacific Islanders, and among 34 (61%) of the 56 WIC state agencies in states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories.” – CDC

Who is generally at risk for obesity:

  • Low-income families
  • Young mothers
  • People without access to healthy food/alternative food options

What can we do to prevent obesity?

  • Spread the knowledge of obesity among friends, families, peers, co-workers, etc. through various use of communications and social media platforms
  • Encourage people to live a active, balance, and healthier lifestyle by:
    • Encouraging healthy habits
    • Participating in activities outside of home/schools/work environment
    • Buying produces at local markets/groceries or partaking in a community garden or growing your own produces
    • Using other methods of transportation such as walking, biking, skating, etc.

Find recommended resources for minorities here.

American Heart Month

http://news.heart.org/

“Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. Every year, 1 in 4 deaths are caused by heart disease.

The good news? Heart disease can often be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage their health conditions. Communities, health professionals, and families can work together to create opportunities for people to make healthier choices.

Make a difference in your community: Spread the word about strategies for preventing heart disease and encourage people to live heart healthy lives.” – https://healthfinder.gov/

What can you do to spread awareness?

  • Share about American Heart Month on your social media platforms, with friends, and families
  • Take action: Be the cure! External Links Disclaimer Logo Join the American Heart Association’s national movement in support of healthier communities and healthier lives.” – https://healthfinder.gov/
  • Join or host community event on finding local resources to live more healthy
    • Local clinics
    • Local fresh, organic, and affordable food options
    • Community parks, clubs, gyms, etc.

Bullying Prevention

url

Act to Change

What is bullying?

Bullying is the act of intimidating someone through influence or through force.

Can bullying happen to anyone?

Yes, bullying does occur everywhere and to anyone of any backgrounds. Bullying doesn’t have to happen person to person. Bullying can occur through online, social media apps, letters, and more.

What can I do if I or a friend is experiencing bullying?

It depends on the severity of the bullying to know what you can do, but here are some tips on how you can handle the situation:

  1. Reach out for help. Whether it is your parents, a legal guardian, a counselor, or your close friend, make sure to let them know that you are being bullied. You don’t need to feel helpless or ashamed of anything. There are people who will support you to help you solve and cope with your situation.
  2. Try to avoid confrontation. If possible, avoid getting into physical fights or argument with bullies. It will not help stop the bullying, it is better to ignore and walk away when you can.
  3. Use {free} services to address about bullying. You can call or email a hotline or a online tool to help you talk about your bullying experience. They will keep you anonymous and your information confidential. This link is a government website that gives your free resources.
  4. Don’t watch, stand up. If you see another person being bullied, the best thing you can do is grab a adult nearby to stop it. If you feel that the situation can be handled by you stepping in, you can try to deescalate the situation by using methods such as:
    1. Pulling the victim away to a place far from the bully
    2. Show up and ask them where they have been (acting as a friend to neutralize the negative space)
    3. If you have someone nearby or ask a stranger to aid the victim to escape the situation
    4. Call 911 if you feel that the situation is dangerous

From the Act to Change website:

  • About 1 out of 5 students report being bullied during the school year
  • Bullying occurs once every 7 minutes 5 to 6 times more likely
  • Bullied students were 5 to 6 times more likely to miss school than those who were not bullied 50% of AA students
  • Half of Asian American students in New York City public schools reported biased based harassment

Public Health: Preventing Suicide

Suicide is a serious concern in the US and it is becoming more common in modern times. The feelings of being stressed, going through depression, or being pressured from outside forces can take a toll on people. So what can we as a society and individuals do to prevent suicide from occurring?

  1. Change the negative perception of those with mental illnesses, disorders, and substance abuse. Often times, people are too embarrassed or ashamed to get help and it could be that they don’t want their problems to be known or allow it to bother other people. “But talking, being open, and making connections with mental health services can make the difference between life and death. Research has uncovered warning signs for suicide. Learn warning signs from SAMHSA’s Suicide Prevention Resource Center exit disclaimer icon and an easy-to-remember warning signs mnemonic from American Association of Suicidology. exit disclaimer icon” – http://www.hhs.gov/
  2. Use public services that are available and always confidential. Rely on your local clinic or go see a therapist to help you or your friend out. Talking about one’s thoughts and feelings can help them organize themselves in terms of how to deal with difficult situations. It’s not easy to open up about sensitive topics but allowing someone in to help and guide them is a step towards a positive direction.
  3. Acknowledge that suicide is preventable. Let’s talk honestly about this difficult issue, use broad collaborative approaches to address the problem, and do all we can to learn more about how to prevent suicide. Help get the message out.

    If you or someone you know needs help, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline exit disclaimer icon (1-800-273-TALK/8255). Last year the Lifeline connected 1.5 million callers with counselors in their local area. Through a network of more than 160 community crisis centers, the Lifeline also offers specialized support to veterans, Spanish speakers and online users.

Facts:

  • Each year there are more than 40,000 suicides in the US – an average of about 117 every day.
  • Rates of suicide have increased by 28 percent since 2000, and it is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States.
  • Every year some 1.1 million adults attempt suicide and about 470,000 people are treated in U.S. emergency departments for nonfatal, self-inflicted injuries.

Statistics and other information is link here!

 

Distracted Driving

What is distracted driving?

While driving, the driver is engaged in another activity that hinders their ability to drive a moving vehicle safely.

What can you do?

  • Pay attention to your surroundings.
  • Follow basic driving regulations and speeding limits.
  • As passengers, alert distracted drivers of oncoming traffic and inform them

A Message from the Minnesota Department of Public Safety:

Distracted Driving, a Deadly Choice for Teens
 Twenty percent of fatalities involving teen drivers in Minnesota are distraction-related.
Distracted-related teen driving fatalities and injuries
Year
Fatalities
Serious injuries
Other Injuries
2011
1
38
1,181
2012
3
21
1,242
2013
8
39
1,117
2014
6
24
999
2015
7
25
1,153
Total
25
147
5,592
Make the Safe Choice
  • Cell phones — Put the phone down, turn it off or place it out of reach.
  • Speak Up – Offer to be the driver’s designated texter.
  • Music and other controls — Pre-program radio stations and arrange music in an easy-to-access spot. Adjust mirrors and ventilation before traveling.
  • Navigation — Map out the destination and enter the GPS route in advance.
  • Eating and drinking — Avoid messy foods and secure drinks.
  • Children — Teach children the importance of good behavior in a vehicle and model proper driving behavior.
  • Passengers — Speak up to stop drivers from distracted driving behavior and offer to help with anything that takes the driver’s attention off the road.