Trends in Obesity Among Early Age Children

CDC

Obesity is a present health concern in the US and it’s important that it is continued to be discussed about. In order to prevent and decrease obesity rates in the US, there have been many attempts and programs to help people better understand what causes obesity, how to prevent it, and the ways we can educate people on it.

Some quick facts from a research conducted by CDC:

“Childhood obesity is associated with negative health consequences in childhood (1) that continue into adulthood (2), putting adults at risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain cancers (1). Obesity disproportionately affects children from low-income families (3).

Overall obesity prevalence increased from 14.0% in 2000 to 15.5% in 2004 and 15.9% in 2010, and then decreased to 14.5% in 2014. During 2010–2014, the prevalence of obesity decreased significantly overall, among non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, American Indian/Alaska Natives and Asians/Pacific Islanders, and among 34 (61%) of the 56 WIC state agencies in states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories.” – CDC

Who is generally at risk for obesity:

  • Low-income families
  • Young mothers
  • People without access to healthy food/alternative food options

What can we do to prevent obesity?

  • Spread the knowledge of obesity among friends, families, peers, co-workers, etc. through various use of communications and social media platforms
  • Encourage people to live a active, balance, and healthier lifestyle by:
    • Encouraging healthy habits
    • Participating in activities outside of home/schools/work environment
    • Buying produces at local markets/groceries or partaking in a community garden or growing your own produces
    • Using other methods of transportation such as walking, biking, skating, etc.

Find recommended resources for minorities here.

Community Efforts Towards Healthier Living

“Community efforts across the country are improving the health of more people by working with groups that include public health professionals, hospitals, local community members, and more.

By Nolan Ly

A lack of access to healthy living opportunities in communities can affect obesity and other preventable chronic diseases. Learn more about community efforts to support healthy eating and active living: http://bit.ly/2knQTvl” – https://www.cdc.gov/

What are the benefits to a active community?

  • Reduce pollution and trash to the environment
  • Provide social and economic opportunities for the people of the community to collaborate and develop better relationships
  • Support social cohesion, events, and activities

What can you do to take part:

  • Going out to explore and enjoy the community by walking, biking, via other outdoor activities etc., either with yourself, friends, or family members.
  • Volunteering at a community garden to help grow veggies/fruits for the community and learning more about gardening along the way.
  • Educate your family, friends, and yourself on recycling, the benefits to it, and how it’s a little step towards making the Earth cleaner.
  • Volunteer for local parks and recreation centers to support and spread awareness for environmental concerns.

American Heart Month

http://news.heart.org/

“Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. Every year, 1 in 4 deaths are caused by heart disease.

The good news? Heart disease can often be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage their health conditions. Communities, health professionals, and families can work together to create opportunities for people to make healthier choices.

Make a difference in your community: Spread the word about strategies for preventing heart disease and encourage people to live heart healthy lives.” – https://healthfinder.gov/

What can you do to spread awareness?

  • Share about American Heart Month on your social media platforms, with friends, and families
  • Take action: Be the cure! External Links Disclaimer Logo Join the American Heart Association’s national movement in support of healthier communities and healthier lives.” – https://healthfinder.gov/
  • Join or host community event on finding local resources to live more healthy
    • Local clinics
    • Local fresh, organic, and affordable food options
    • Community parks, clubs, gyms, etc.

Health Topic of the Day: Breastfeeding

breastfeeding_2499833g

www.thehindu.com

Today’s health topic is all about breastfeeding. Breastfeeding is usually defined as a mother providing her infant with food/milk from her breast. It was commonly practiced in the past (nowadays it is more prominent poor/rural areas) in when mothers had to provide for their babies with their own milk and the availability of baby formula or food was not as common. The practice of breastfeeding gradually faded in human society as it advanced. But recent studies showed that we should get back to breastfeeding as it was proven to be more nutritious and beneficial to both the mother and child.

What are the benefits of breast feeding?

  • Breastmilk has all the nutritions and antibodies passed from the mother to the infant which can contribute to the baby’s overall health and growth
  • Builds a bond between the mother and child
  • Breastmilk is easy for the baby to digest
  • Mothers can choose on how long they want to breastfeed
  • Breastfeeding can help reduce cost for baby formula/food for a period of time
  • For more info on the benefits of breastfeeding, click here!

According to CDC:

  • 4 out of 5 (81.1%) started to breastfeed. High breastfeeding initiation rates, or the percentage of infants who start out breastfeeding, show that most mothers in the U.S. want to breastfeed and are trying to do so.
  • In Minnesota :
    • Breastfeeding rate at 12 months increased from 35.8% to 41.0%, a total of 15% increase.
    • Exclusive breastfeeding at three months went from 48.6 to 53.9 percent, an 11-percent increase.

“These rates make Minnesota a top breastfeeding state in the nation, ranking seventh for beginning breastfeeding (initiation) and fifth for breastfeeding at six months.

Though the percentage of women initiating breastfeeding in the Minnesota WIC Program has risen from 63 percent to 80 percent since 2001, some women face more barriers to breastfeeding and are initiating at lower rates. Minnesota breastfeeding rates vary significantly by race and ethnicity. MDH and partners promote public health strategies that make it easier for all Minnesota women to breastfeed. This work includes supporting peer counseling and breastfeeding friendly policies and practices in hospitals, workplaces, childcare settings and the community.” – http://www.health.state.mn.us/

 

April is Minority Health Month

The theme for 2016 is “Accelerating Health Equity for the Nation.” – www.cdc.gov

Image of smiling African American girl with arms crossed under chin leaning on table at school, while two other children look on - Every community deserves good health. This April we celebrate National Minority Health Month. National Minority Health Month logo - Accelerating Health Equity for the Nation.

Picture belongs to www.hhs.gov

The goal of Minority Health Month is to bring awareness of health disparities and to promote health equity among our diverse communities. It’s important to address health concerns and problems prevalent in different groups of people because there are things that we can do to help others live a safer and healthier life. Here are some ways in which people have implemented to help others:

  • Encouragement of breastfeeding among low-income and minority populations
  • Providing info on healthier food choices to children at home and school & bringing awareness to the increasing rate of child obesity
  • Educating communities that are at risk of certain health problems
    • “This first national study on Hispanic health risks and leading causes of death in the United States by CDC shows that Hispanics had higher death rates than Non-Hispanic whites from diabetes and chronic liver disease and cirrhosis (scarring of the liver). The report encourages the use of community health workers, also called promotores de salud, to provide resources to educate the Hispanic community about health risks and preventive services.” – www.cdc.gov

What can you do as a participant?

  • Spread the words! Follow @MinorityHealth for great information on #healthequity & make sure to share on your social media!
  • Participate in an official (or related) events near you!

Click on the official website for info on events, social media, & more!

How Can People Quit Smoking?

react

AMA Postcard

It’s not a fun or easy topic to discuss about, but smoking is a real issue all around the world. If you happen to be a smoker and is trying to quit or knows somebody who would like to quit, there are resources available to you and anyone in need of help. You can receive the help and support of people who wants to help you without being judge.

Here are some local and government resources that you can use:

  • 1-800-QUIT-NOW is a government support program that is available for smokers through this phone number, a phone app, and follow them on social media.
  • Minnesota based programs, for more info click here.
    • Asian Smokers’ Quitline: This is a free program to help smokers quit. Services include self-help materials, a referral list of other programs, one-on-one counseling over the phone, and a free two-week starter kit of nicotine patches. Visit asiansmokersquitline.org.
    • Smokefree Teen Smokefree Teen helps teens take control of their health. It offers free support for quitting, including their QuitSTART smartphone app. Visit Teen.Smokefree.gov.
    • Smokefree Español: Este sitio en la red ofrece enfoques recomendados sobre cómo dejar de fumar, información sobre un amplio rango de temas relacionados con el fumar y dejar de fumar, y una fuente de recursos gratuitos en español. La información disponible en este sitio en la red puede darle apoyo con sus necesidades inmediatas y a largo plazo a medida que deja de fumar.
  • Want to get a better idea of the trend in tobacco usage:
    • Nearly 3 of every 100 middle school students (2.5%) reported in 2014 that they smoked cigarettes in the past 30 days—a decrease from 4.3% in 2011.
    • More than 13 of every 100 high school students (13.4%) reported in 2014 that they used electronic cigarettes in the past 30 days—an increase from 1.5% in 2011.
    • Check out CDC for more information.

Information used belongs to rightful owners.

Great Resources & Tips for the Holiday!

The holiday season is here and that means that there is going to be lots of family and friend gatherings accompanied by presents, music, and delicious foods. And remember to take care of yourself so that you can be in your best shape for the holiday! So forget to check out these resources down below for helpful information and fun tips:

  • The 12 Ways to Health Holiday Song was created by CDC and it’s a song about keep yourself safe and healthy for this holiday!
  • Want to try out new recipes for the holidays? Check out this link for recipes of Korean food! Or how about Hmong food recipes? And, you don’t have to choose from the links posted here as there are various websites you can choose from.

pork_soft_bone

http://hmongrecipes.com/

  • An alternative to hot drinks like coffee and hot chocolate is tea! Tea is a much healthier alternative with less calories and sugar. Bonus: the variety of tea available on the market is tremendous so you’ll probably find something that suits your taste. Also, you can always add ice, sugar, and mix it with other tea leaves if you want to.
  • Want to give gifts on a budget? If you’re on a budget, it’s still possible to give great gifts as long as they’re meaningful. Check out this link here for 101+ diy gift ideas and YouTube for creative and fun ideas!

candy-cane-dip

http://www.iheartnaptime.net/