Trends in Obesity Among Early Age Children

CDC

Obesity is a present health concern in the US and it’s important that it is continued to be discussed about. In order to prevent and decrease obesity rates in the US, there have been many attempts and programs to help people better understand what causes obesity, how to prevent it, and the ways we can educate people on it.

Some quick facts from a research conducted by CDC:

“Childhood obesity is associated with negative health consequences in childhood (1) that continue into adulthood (2), putting adults at risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain cancers (1). Obesity disproportionately affects children from low-income families (3).

Overall obesity prevalence increased from 14.0% in 2000 to 15.5% in 2004 and 15.9% in 2010, and then decreased to 14.5% in 2014. During 2010–2014, the prevalence of obesity decreased significantly overall, among non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, American Indian/Alaska Natives and Asians/Pacific Islanders, and among 34 (61%) of the 56 WIC state agencies in states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories.” – CDC

Who is generally at risk for obesity:

  • Low-income families
  • Young mothers
  • People without access to healthy food/alternative food options

What can we do to prevent obesity?

  • Spread the knowledge of obesity among friends, families, peers, co-workers, etc. through various use of communications and social media platforms
  • Encourage people to live a active, balance, and healthier lifestyle by:
    • Encouraging healthy habits
    • Participating in activities outside of home/schools/work environment
    • Buying produces at local markets/groceries or partaking in a community garden or growing your own produces
    • Using other methods of transportation such as walking, biking, skating, etc.

Find recommended resources for minorities here.

Making New Year’s Resolution Goals

Each year, people make New Year’s resolution goals that they want to achieve for the upcoming new year. It usually is a goal that seeks self improvement or changing things in one’s life. It’s not necessary to start out the years with goals or without, but it is good to at least have some idea of what kind of things you want to do or change either about yourself or your life.

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www.care2.com

So what’s the point of New Year’s resolution goals?

  • It serve as a reminder of the goal that you want to achieve throughout the year
  • Motivates you to take action and stay on track with your plans
  • It is small stepping stones that can people take to achieve bigger goals

There are different goals for everyone, but the most common ones are:

  • Lose weight
  • Live a healthier lifestyle
  • Do well in school or go back to pursue education
  • Obtain something important (buying a home, getting a car, obtaining citizenship, etc.)
  • Travel more
  • Save more money

So what actions can you take to achieve your resolution goals?

  • Put a reminder in a notebook, cellphone app, or on a piece of paper on your fridge to constantly tell you what you want to do differently, achieve, or improve on
  • Plan and take small steps first (Putting aside $10 a month can help you buy something more valuable in the future)
  • Think about the reasons why you want to achieve your goals:
    • Is it for self-improvement? What about yourself specifically that you want to improve on? Your sociability/communication skills? Your physical state? Your living lifestyle?
    • Is education important to you? Do you plan to pursue higher education and beyond? What type of field that interests you that would need you to have a certain type of educational background?

Who are the Sandwich Generation?

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https://www.psychologytoday.com

More than 1 in 8 Americans are both raising a child and caring for a parent. They are known as the sandwich generation. Seven to 10 million adults are also caring for an aging parent who lives far away.” – https://www.cdc.gov/

So why is this occurring? Possible reasons are because:

  • More people than ever are aging
  • People are living longer due to advancements in medicine and technology
  • It is taking longer and harder for children to become financially independent

(CDC) Some caregivers may need to change an employment situation to fit in their caregiving role. Caregivers may consider talking to a supervisor about work options allowing the caregiver to maintain both their employment and caregiving roles. These options could include the following:

  1. Having more flexible hours
  2. Reducing working hours
  3. Working from home
  4. Taking a leave of absence
  5. Downgrading to a less demanding job

Facts (CDC):

  • People giving care to both young and older family members report higher levels of depression, anxiety, and lower quality of life. Research has shown that 17% of these caregivers rate their health as “fair” or “poor” compared with 10% of non-caregivers.
  • Among the 44 million unpaid caregivers to older adults in the United States, 75% are employed. The average employed caregiver works about 35 hours a week.

 

Tips for this Holiday!

healthy-holidays
1) Keep the focus on fun, not food. Indulge in only the most special holiday treats.  For example in the Chinese new year eve dinner, the dumpling is the most special dish, and when families prepare the dumplings, they will hind the couple coins in the dumplings, who gets to bite on the coins, who will have the best luck at coming year.  It’s fun to eat the dumplings to find the coins, but keep in mind not overdoing it.
2) Staying physically active during the holidays.  A study conducted by the U.S. government found adults gained, on average, more than a pound of body weight during the winter holidays – and that they were not at all likely to shed that weight the following year.  The good news is that the people who reported the most physical activity through the holiday season showed the least weight gain. Some even managed to lose weight.
3) Toast the new year with just one glass of bubbly.
Alcohol can interfere with your blood sugar by slowing the release of glucose into the bloodstream; it also contain a lot of calories – 89 calories per glass of white wine or champagne, 55 calories in a shot of vodka, and 170 calories in a pint of stout beer. What’s more, alcohol breaks down your inhibitions and judgment, which makes you that much less likely to resist the junk foods that you would otherwise be able to pass by.
4) Shop wisely this season. It’s easy to be tempted to buy things that you don’t need that are on “sale” and “clearance”. Best thing you can do to prevent this from happening is:
  • Set a budget to limit your spending on gifts.
  • Make a list of all the people you are going to buy gifts for and the things you plan on buying.
  • Differentiate wants from needs. “I want this, but do I need it?”
  • Use coupons when applicable. There are coupons available through online websites, in your mails, and in stores.

Distracted Driving

What is distracted driving?

While driving, the driver is engaged in another activity that hinders their ability to drive a moving vehicle safely.

What can you do?

  • Pay attention to your surroundings.
  • Follow basic driving regulations and speeding limits.
  • As passengers, alert distracted drivers of oncoming traffic and inform them

A Message from the Minnesota Department of Public Safety:

Distracted Driving, a Deadly Choice for Teens
 Twenty percent of fatalities involving teen drivers in Minnesota are distraction-related.
Distracted-related teen driving fatalities and injuries
Year
Fatalities
Serious injuries
Other Injuries
2011
1
38
1,181
2012
3
21
1,242
2013
8
39
1,117
2014
6
24
999
2015
7
25
1,153
Total
25
147
5,592
Make the Safe Choice
  • Cell phones — Put the phone down, turn it off or place it out of reach.
  • Speak Up – Offer to be the driver’s designated texter.
  • Music and other controls — Pre-program radio stations and arrange music in an easy-to-access spot. Adjust mirrors and ventilation before traveling.
  • Navigation — Map out the destination and enter the GPS route in advance.
  • Eating and drinking — Avoid messy foods and secure drinks.
  • Children — Teach children the importance of good behavior in a vehicle and model proper driving behavior.
  • Passengers — Speak up to stop drivers from distracted driving behavior and offer to help with anything that takes the driver’s attention off the road.
 

Walk to School Day – Oct 5!!!

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www.walkbiketoschool.org

Oct 5, the first Wednesday of this month, celebrates the “Walk to School Day“! The event is to promote children to walk to school to bring awareness to living a active and healthy life.

Why participate? 

  • It’s a great way to be a part of a global event and to promote health, to identify safer routes for walking in my community, and to improve air quality by parking my car.
  • To create a healthy lifestyle. Physically active kids are more likely to become healthy, physically active adults, which means that the behavior of regular physical activity early needs to be fostered at an early age.
  • To connect with my community. A walk to school improves neighborhood connections and boosts a sense of community.
  • To reduce transportation cost and pollution from transportation. Walking or biking is a great alternative to this.

A Litte About the History

“Organized by the Partnership for a Walkable America, Walk to School Day in the USA began in 1997 as a one-day event aimed at building awareness for the need for walkable communities. The event became international in 2000 when the USA, UK and CA all celebrated together on the first Wednesday of October. Currently, the international celebration includes 40 countries.” – http://www.saferoutesinfo.org/

Click here for more info!

The Unmarried and Single Americans

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http://www.census.gov/

We want to highlight the contributions of people who are unmarried and/or living the “single life” in society. Let’s celebrate the idea of living and being single in the US. We are always told that we need to be with someone most of our life to be happy. But being happy starts within yourself. By being alone, you can discover what you enjoy doing, what you dislike, things that makes you happy, and so on. And best of all, the single life also means you are responsible for yourself.

Fun facts:

  • 109 million – The number of unmarried people in America 18 and older in 2015. This group made up 45 percent of all U.S. residents 18 and older
  • 88 – The number of unmarried men 18 and older for every 100 unmarried women in the United States in 2015
  • 59 million – The number of households maintained by unmarried men and women in 2015. These households comprised 47 percent of households nationwide.

All statistics accredited to http://www.census.gov/.