A Reminder To Be One With The Community

After reading the article titled “The Center for Native and Pacific Health Disparities Research Walks Beside, Not In Front of, Diverse Hawaiian Communities to Control Diabetes,” it made me think about the good point that Dr. Marjorie Mau, a lead principal investigator of the Center for Native and Pacific Health Disparities Research, addressed on how they walk beside the community rather than in front of them. When trying to help the community, I think that it is best to make them feel like family; to feel comfortable and at ease with you. With the information we get about health issues in our communities, it definitely makes us want to address it and help those who may need some guidance. With this, we have to also remember that we can not just try to budge into their lives and take over, even if it is for good intentions.

The article mentioned how the Partnership for Improving Lifestyle Interventions (PILI) project addressed obesity by adapting an existing weight loss education program. They used local languages and examples that were relevant to those in the community. There was also a program added to help participants with the support of family members and the community; this program was culturally adapted based on its community. Personally, I have never thought about letting myself be apart of a research. The whole concept of trying to improve health by researching is amazing but when I think about allowing research programs work on my body, it just doesn’t sound too pleasing, depending on what it is. So after reading this article, I realized that maybe it isn’t too bad. Also, I loved how the research program approached the topic of research and what they were focusing on. Without a doubt, I think that their approach/idea on research and community can be applied to other things.

Dr. Mau and the Center for Native and Pacific Health Disparities Research definitely has good intentions to help the communities, mainly focused in Hawaii. The overall thought of walking besides them/the community and helping with issues they/the community care about can definitely help with the factor of gaining trust and opening up for help/guidance. Since our goal for the concept of Bicultural Healthy Living is to help support people in living healthily within cultures people adapt to, applying these ideas and strategies will greatly benefit the community and our goal.

Remember to lend out a helping hand but also remember to think about who those you help are as a person. Diversity is all around us but sometimes we forget that we live in a world where every culture is different but it is normal. Every community may be different so it is important to help with things that matter to them while making them feel like family.

 

 

To read more about the article, “The Center for Native and Pacific Health Disparities Research Walks Beside, Not In Front of, Diverse Hawaiian Communities to Control Diabetes,” click the link: https://www.nimhd.nih.gov/news-events/features/community-health/diabetes-risk-and-native-hawaiians.html

Does Your Loved One Have Depression?


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The article, Why Asian-American Seniors Have High Rates Of Depression But Rarely Seek Help,” written by Kimberly Yam has great detail showing culture differences and how it affects the daily lives of many. I loved how this article was able to snap a reminder into my head about my parents and grandparents. I will be restating some of the things from the article and giving my opinion on the topic.

In the Asian-American community, health is one of the biggest topics that become touchy to talk about, especially with the seniors. Overall health problems are not usually brought up unless one is really needing help; but with mental health many seniors do not seek help for it at all. According to the American Psychological Association, “Asian Americans are almost three times less likely than their white counterparts to seek mental health services.” One of the main factors to this is fear of being shameful. With the Asian culture, pride is very important and that is why some things may not be said or done in order to not “embarrass” the family.

We have to remember that most of our elders have experienced trauma from many of the world and life tragedies that has happened. Adapting to a new place and experiencing the feeling of being separated because of culture and language can have a huge influence on how one may feel. Our seniors/elders in the Asian community may hide their feelings of sadness and loneliness in order to avoid burdening the family. With this, the younger generation of sons, daughters, relatives…etc., should reach out when they feel that there may be some kind of loneliness.

When reading this article, I started thinking about my grandfather. When he was still on this beautiful planet, I met him once when he came to visit my family from Laos. He was one of the sweetest people I have ever met. He smiled a lot and didn’t talk about things much. When we went for walks, he seemed so peaceful. He always stared at the sky and just looked and admired the landscape. Thinking back now, I wish I spent more time showing him many beautiful things in life. I also wish I talked to him more about his past, present, wishes, happiness, and sorrows. Just thinking about how he was when he had visit made me realize that he had a lot of sadness and pain still in him. This realization definitely made think more about checking on my loved ones.

Loneliness and depression can happen to anyone. It may be harder for some to express the fact that they have these feelings. In the Asian culture, admitting that you need help isn’t really a thing. Elders may probably address mental health issues in different ways, like headaches, sleepless nights, pain in the stomach…etc. So it is important for loved ones to ask and spend the time to really try and help.

I am Asian American and when I was reading this article, the descriptions and beliefs about the Asian American culture definitely fit mine. My thoughts and culture may not fit every persons’ but overall, being able to fit and connect to these descriptions and beliefs made me more aware of possible emotions and thoughts my elders may be having. Mental illness is not thought about a lot at all in the Asian community. I hope that my brief article will inspire you to just really look after your loved ones also and remember to be aware of possible symptoms of depression or loneliness.

Read the article by Kimberly Yam at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/asian-american-senior-mental-health_us_591c53eee4b041db8965c58e
This article is definitely worth putting time into reading. I loved everything about it.

Community Efforts Towards Healthier Living

“Community efforts across the country are improving the health of more people by working with groups that include public health professionals, hospitals, local community members, and more.

By Nolan Ly

A lack of access to healthy living opportunities in communities can affect obesity and other preventable chronic diseases. Learn more about community efforts to support healthy eating and active living: http://bit.ly/2knQTvl” – https://www.cdc.gov/

What are the benefits to a active community?

  • Reduce pollution and trash to the environment
  • Provide social and economic opportunities for the people of the community to collaborate and develop better relationships
  • Support social cohesion, events, and activities

What can you do to take part:

  • Going out to explore and enjoy the community by walking, biking, via other outdoor activities etc., either with yourself, friends, or family members.
  • Volunteering at a community garden to help grow veggies/fruits for the community and learning more about gardening along the way.
  • Educate your family, friends, and yourself on recycling, the benefits to it, and how it’s a little step towards making the Earth cleaner.
  • Volunteer for local parks and recreation centers to support and spread awareness for environmental concerns.

Who are the Sandwich Generation?

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https://www.psychologytoday.com

More than 1 in 8 Americans are both raising a child and caring for a parent. They are known as the sandwich generation. Seven to 10 million adults are also caring for an aging parent who lives far away.” – https://www.cdc.gov/

So why is this occurring? Possible reasons are because:

  • More people than ever are aging
  • People are living longer due to advancements in medicine and technology
  • It is taking longer and harder for children to become financially independent

(CDC) Some caregivers may need to change an employment situation to fit in their caregiving role. Caregivers may consider talking to a supervisor about work options allowing the caregiver to maintain both their employment and caregiving roles. These options could include the following:

  1. Having more flexible hours
  2. Reducing working hours
  3. Working from home
  4. Taking a leave of absence
  5. Downgrading to a less demanding job

Facts (CDC):

  • People giving care to both young and older family members report higher levels of depression, anxiety, and lower quality of life. Research has shown that 17% of these caregivers rate their health as “fair” or “poor” compared with 10% of non-caregivers.
  • Among the 44 million unpaid caregivers to older adults in the United States, 75% are employed. The average employed caregiver works about 35 hours a week.

 

Changing Demographic in the US

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“On November 18, the Large Urban County Caucus (LUCC) of the National Association of Counties convened in New York City, bringing together county leaders from across the country to share ideas and develop innovative policy solutions to address their most pressing challenges.

Although they represent just 4 percent of the 3,142 counties in the United States, large urban counties (LUCs) — those with more than 500,000 residents — are home to nearly half of the U.S. population. In other words, as the graphic below illustrates, more than 150 million people live in the 133 LUCs in the United States.

So it is no surprise that these counties are at the forefront of the nation’s shifting demographics. As data in the National Equity Atlas show, the face of America is changing: Just a few years from now, the majority of people under the age of 18 will be youth of color, and by 2044 the United States will be a majority people-of-color nation.” –http://nationalequityatlas.org/

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So what can LUCC do to help people develop their fullest potential?

  • Prioritize in hiring for locals and invest in poorer neighborhoods through providing employment and training opportunities
  • Require businesses and companies to have equity benchmarks and hold them accountable for delivering it towards people
  • “Remove barriers to preventive services to improve and safeguard the health of tomorrow’s leaders, innovators, and workers.” – http://nationalequityatlas.org/
  • Ensure that jobs are provided with benefits of health care, paid sick leave, family support, and such.

Staying Healthy & Fit this Holiday

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AMA STEP UP YOUTH 2015

With the holiday season around, it is easy to forget how to maintain a healthy lifestyle! So take this time of the year to review what you can do to improve your overall health. Also, it’s a good time to think about what kind of health goals you want to achieve now and in the future. But don’t worry, it is easier than you think. Here are 5 easy steps you can do to stay active and healthy:

  1. Work out on a schedule! If you already have a work out schedule, try your best to stick with it. In this way, your body and mind will get use to it. Consistency is key to keeping your body healthy and active! But if you don’t have one yet, try to work out or go to the gym as often as you can. Then find the proper time that you are available each week to work out and try to stick with that schedule!
  2. Stay warm! It is colder around this month with the snow and windchill, so make sure to protect yourself with appropriate clothing. If your body temperature drops, you can get ill or even frostbites! Ouch, nobody would want that!
  3. Keep yourself healthy with healthy habits! Little things that you may do will affect your overall health and it is very important that you try to keep your life balanced. In between work, free time, sleep, being sanitary, and other things, being able to manage them will reduce your stress level!
  4. Talk with friends and family! This is the season of gathering so not discuss things with your loved ones? It can help you destress, get to know people better, and you can learn new things. Having a social life is part of a healthy lifestyle!
  5. Join a community event! It can help you stay active physically and socially! Whether it is a marathon, a fundraiser, or a social gathering, it is a great way for you to interact with your community.

Language Learning at Home

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http://mplswtg.org/

Many people today are born and raised in a bilingual home. It not only enhances the communication within the family, but help build the concept of diversity and acceptances towards different people. Also, it helps English language learners in their education when they have something to reference to and therefore, can build a better understanding of English. By being to recognize that learning at home is a resource, children and adults can use it more often

“Research suggests children educated initially in their home language learn a second language more proficiently and achieve more academic success than those who have not had such a solid foundation. Once students have built basic literacy skills in their home language, they will be able to apply those skills to the new language.” http://mplswtg.org/

Here are some tips on how to learn your language at home:

  • Have daily conversations with your family members that speak to you in your native language. Try to have meaningful and deep conversations that can actually help you become better.
  • Listen/watch TVs, dramas, and music! By listening to your native language, you’ll learn how to speak it better. It naturally enhances your speaking skills without you trying.
  • Reading articles/books in your own language can help you with grammar and writing. One problem with being bilingual is not being able to to read and write in both languages. So only by practicing can it help the technical components in a language.