Trends in Obesity Among Early Age Children

CDC

Obesity is a present health concern in the US and it’s important that it is continued to be discussed about. In order to prevent and decrease obesity rates in the US, there have been many attempts and programs to help people better understand what causes obesity, how to prevent it, and the ways we can educate people on it.

Some quick facts from a research conducted by CDC:

“Childhood obesity is associated with negative health consequences in childhood (1) that continue into adulthood (2), putting adults at risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain cancers (1). Obesity disproportionately affects children from low-income families (3).

Overall obesity prevalence increased from 14.0% in 2000 to 15.5% in 2004 and 15.9% in 2010, and then decreased to 14.5% in 2014. During 2010–2014, the prevalence of obesity decreased significantly overall, among non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, American Indian/Alaska Natives and Asians/Pacific Islanders, and among 34 (61%) of the 56 WIC state agencies in states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories.” – CDC

Who is generally at risk for obesity:

  • Low-income families
  • Young mothers
  • People without access to healthy food/alternative food options

What can we do to prevent obesity?

  • Spread the knowledge of obesity among friends, families, peers, co-workers, etc. through various use of communications and social media platforms
  • Encourage people to live a active, balance, and healthier lifestyle by:
    • Encouraging healthy habits
    • Participating in activities outside of home/schools/work environment
    • Buying produces at local markets/groceries or partaking in a community garden or growing your own produces
    • Using other methods of transportation such as walking, biking, skating, etc.

Find recommended resources for minorities here.

January 23-29: National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week

“While there are many questions around alcohol and drug use and addiction, it’s not always easy to find factual answers. Information from the internet, social media, TV, movies, and music isn’t accurate.

For young people, friends can also be a source of misinformation. From January 23-29, National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week provides the facts about drugs, alcohol, and addiction. This week-long health observance is an opportunity to hear directly from scientists and other experts through educational events, Drugs & Alcohol Chat Day, and partnerships. While the week primarily targets high school students across America, the resources and information from these events can be used by any organization as a part of their prevention strategy.” – https://teens.drugabuse.gov/

Statistics:

  • Drug use is most common among young adults who are 18 to 25 years old. Rates of current (past month) use of illicit drugs in 2015 were higher for young adults aged 18 to 25 (22.3 percent) than for youths aged 12 to 17 (8.8 percent) and adults aged 26 or older (8.2 percent)
  • Although drinking by persons under the age of 21 is illegal, people aged 12 to 20 years drink 11% of all alcohol consumed in the United States. More than 90% of this alcohol is consumed in the form of binge drinks.
  • About 570,000 people die annually in the U.S. due to drug use. That breaks down to more than 480,000 deaths related to tobacco, about 31,000 due to alcohol, nearly 22,000 due to overdose from illicit (illegal) drugs, and close to 23,000 due to overdose from prescription pain relievers.
  • In 2015, the Monitoring the Future Survey reported that 10% of 8th graders and 35% of 12th graders drank during the past 30 days, and 5% of 8th graders and 17% of 12th graders binge drank during the past 2 weeks.
  • According to NIDA’s Monitoring the Future survey–a national survey of 8th, 10th, and 12th graders–past-year use of illicit drugs other than marijuana was down from recent peaks in all three grades in 2016. Also notable is the decrease in tobacco use, which is now at the lowest rate in the survey’s history for all three grades.

Statistics were taken from https://teens.drugabuse.gov/ and www.cdc.gov/.

Who are the Sandwich Generation?

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https://www.psychologytoday.com

More than 1 in 8 Americans are both raising a child and caring for a parent. They are known as the sandwich generation. Seven to 10 million adults are also caring for an aging parent who lives far away.” – https://www.cdc.gov/

So why is this occurring? Possible reasons are because:

  • More people than ever are aging
  • People are living longer due to advancements in medicine and technology
  • It is taking longer and harder for children to become financially independent

(CDC) Some caregivers may need to change an employment situation to fit in their caregiving role. Caregivers may consider talking to a supervisor about work options allowing the caregiver to maintain both their employment and caregiving roles. These options could include the following:

  1. Having more flexible hours
  2. Reducing working hours
  3. Working from home
  4. Taking a leave of absence
  5. Downgrading to a less demanding job

Facts (CDC):

  • People giving care to both young and older family members report higher levels of depression, anxiety, and lower quality of life. Research has shown that 17% of these caregivers rate their health as “fair” or “poor” compared with 10% of non-caregivers.
  • Among the 44 million unpaid caregivers to older adults in the United States, 75% are employed. The average employed caregiver works about 35 hours a week.

 

Bullying Prevention

url

Act to Change

What is bullying?

Bullying is the act of intimidating someone through influence or through force.

Can bullying happen to anyone?

Yes, bullying does occur everywhere and to anyone of any backgrounds. Bullying doesn’t have to happen person to person. Bullying can occur through online, social media apps, letters, and more.

What can I do if I or a friend is experiencing bullying?

It depends on the severity of the bullying to know what you can do, but here are some tips on how you can handle the situation:

  1. Reach out for help. Whether it is your parents, a legal guardian, a counselor, or your close friend, make sure to let them know that you are being bullied. You don’t need to feel helpless or ashamed of anything. There are people who will support you to help you solve and cope with your situation.
  2. Try to avoid confrontation. If possible, avoid getting into physical fights or argument with bullies. It will not help stop the bullying, it is better to ignore and walk away when you can.
  3. Use {free} services to address about bullying. You can call or email a hotline or a online tool to help you talk about your bullying experience. They will keep you anonymous and your information confidential. This link is a government website that gives your free resources.
  4. Don’t watch, stand up. If you see another person being bullied, the best thing you can do is grab a adult nearby to stop it. If you feel that the situation can be handled by you stepping in, you can try to deescalate the situation by using methods such as:
    1. Pulling the victim away to a place far from the bully
    2. Show up and ask them where they have been (acting as a friend to neutralize the negative space)
    3. If you have someone nearby or ask a stranger to aid the victim to escape the situation
    4. Call 911 if you feel that the situation is dangerous

From the Act to Change website:

  • About 1 out of 5 students report being bullied during the school year
  • Bullying occurs once every 7 minutes 5 to 6 times more likely
  • Bullied students were 5 to 6 times more likely to miss school than those who were not bullied 50% of AA students
  • Half of Asian American students in New York City public schools reported biased based harassment

This Month in Japan | April

Uzuki, the traditional name for April based on the lunar calendar, means “hare month.” It has been speculated that the name uzuki corresponds to the year of the rabbit in the Chinese zodiac.

For many years, the only national holiday this month was Greenery Day, on April 29. The 29th was the birthday of the late Emperor Showa so in 2007 Greenery Day was moved to May 4, and April 29 was renamed Showa no hi, or Showa Day.

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https://www.gapyear.com/

Golden Week starts at the end of April in Japan (Showa Day [April 29], Constitution Day [May 3], Greenery Day [May 4], Children’s Day [May 5]). It is common for businesses to give their employees the whole week off, making it a busy time for travel among the Japanese people.” – Credits belong to rightful owner

Other fun facts:

  • The sakura season began in March and continue towards the end of April. Visitors still have time to enjoy the cherry blossoms at local parks and gardens across Japan.
  • Roppongi Art Night is a free event that allows people and tourists to view amazing art collections in the neighborhood of Roppongi. It is an event held from 10AM throughout the night.  “Galleries that will stay open throughout the night: Roppongi Hills, Mori Art Museum, Tokyo Midtown, Suntory Museum of Art, 21_21 DESIGN SIGHT, The National Art Center, Tokyo.” – http://www.tokyo-top-guide.com/

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http://www.tokyoweekender.com/

  • Earth Day (April 23-24) is celebrated in Japan through a event hosted at Yoyogi Park. It’s an opportunity for organizations to present their causes to the public and allows people to become informed of other environmental issues. Other features of this event are foods, performances, and music.
  • The 2016 Takayama Spring Festival is held on April 14-15 and it’s located in the town of Takayama. It’s known to host antique floats that are uniquely designed and decorated with lanterns. For more detail on the event, click here!

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http://incrediblephototours.com/

The Truth About E-Cigarette

People think that using e-cigarettes in place of smoking cigarettes is a “healthier” alternative. It has become more popular among youths as it provide similar effects and it comes in various flavors. Social media and pop culture has been glamouring vaping as form of a trend and “cool” thing to do. But studies have shown that regardless of smoking cigarettes or e-cigarette, both will put your health at risk at the exposure to nicotine. Here are some facts you need to know about e-cigarettes:

  • Nicotine affects brain development among children and teens
  • Harmful chemicals can be found in various flavors and affects the body differently
  • The vapor created from using e-cigarettes contains leads, tin, nickel, and other metals
  • E-cigarettes are not an effective way to quit smoking, people trying to quit should try to quit completely
  • “Initial tests have found e-cigarettes contain varying levels of the addictive substance nicotine as well as cancer-causing chemicals, such as formaldehyde.” – www.lung.org

CDC E-cigarette Fact Sheet

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This Month in Japan | January

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http://travel.rakuten.com/

“The old name for the month of January, Mutsuki, means “month of harmony” or “month where friends and relatives gather.”

One of the most important national holidays in Japan is Oshogatsu (New Year’s Day). Schools are typically closed for about 2 weeks, and many business are closed from December 28 through January 1. Read 14 Ways to Have a Happy New Year in Japan.

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http://www.dnaindia.com/

Coming-of-Age Day, observed on the second Monday of January, is another national holiday this month. On this day, women often wear an elaborate style of kimono called furisode while men typically wear formal suits to celebrate being 20-years-old, the age of adulthood in Japan.” – Rightful owner

Here are some fun things that occur in this month:

  • Wakakusa Yamayaki – January 23, Nara
    Centuries ago there was a land dispute between Kofukuji and Todaiji temples in Nara. As part of the dispute someone ended up burning down Mount Wakakusa. Now they do it every year as part of the Wakakusa Yamayaki Festival.” – http://www.japan-talk.com/
  • There’s a ton of festivals that features snow/ice art in the cold season of Japan. They are visited by people who comes to visit the beautiful sceneries.
  • Although it is the coldest month of the year, this is the time where the sun shines the most. This allows people to enjoy outdoor activities even more!
  • This is the month that signifies the beginning of a new year and that means that many people will come visit shrines to pray.

Happy Martin Luther King Day!

In celebration of Martin Luther King day, let’s highlight some of the accomplishments from the African American community and other fun facts!

  • On November 2, 1983, the bill for Martin Luther King day was signed by President Ronald Reagan.
  • Michael Curry became the the first Black leader of Episcopal church in June of 2015.
  • “The poverty rate among blacks is the highest of any racial or ethnic group, but has declined slightly over time, from 31.3% in 1976 to 27.2% in 2014, according to census data.”  – http://www.pewresearch.org/
  • Here are some ways to reflect on this day:
    1. Think about yourself in place of other people who are different from you.
    2. Become part of or be a supporter of a positive change! Whether it is in politics, activism, or a cause that you believe in.
    3. Open your eyes and ears! Start to take notice of the injustice around the world and think about what you can do to serve others.

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For more info, click on the link here.

This Month in Japan | December

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“Shiwasu, the traditional name for December, refers to teachers or priests rushing around hastily. This is because the teachers and priests at temples or shrines are busy preparing and cleaning for upcoming New Year celebrations.

The Emperor’s birthday, December 23, is the primary national holiday in Japan this month. His birthday is one of the only two occasions per year when the Imperial Grounds are open to the public. The end of year holidays on December 29, 30 and 31 that continue into the beginning of January (1-3) are also official national holidays for the purpose of enjoying the end of the year.

Bonenkai parties (or “year forgetting parties”) are often held in December with companies, organizations, families, and friends to forget the troubles and worries of the year.” – Rightful owner

Fun facts & info:

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Photo credit belongs to http://kelly.cybr.org/

  • Nabe is a popular dish to eat during the cold season! What is it? It’s Japanese hotpot and usually, there is a group of people eating the food that’s cooked on a pot with a gas burner. It is a great way for people to bond through eating!
  • Hotsprings or onsen, are a popular attraction year round, but even more so during the colder season. It is a public bathing house and can be indoors or outdoors. It is a great way to relax the body!
  • December is a popular month for people to visit shrines and temples as it is coming close to the New Year! People gather around from all over the country to pray and ask their wishes to come true.
  • There will be tons of festivals occurring happening all over in Japan! Just to name some, Fukugonji Fire Festival, Akou Gishisa, & Sanpoji Daikon Festival. Here is a link for more info!

November is National Diabetes Month

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It’s Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

http://www.cdc.gov/

“November is National Diabetes Month, and the City of Minneapolis wants to help prevent diabetes by encouraging people to get screened for Type 2 diabetes and then take action if they’re at risk for developing it.

The Minnesota Department of Health estimates that one out of three Minnesotans have prediabetes, but most of them don’t know it. People with prediabetes are likely to develop Type 2 diabetes within five years if they don’t take action.” – http://www.minneapolismn.gov/

The Minneapolis Health Department, with funding from the Minnesota Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sponsors the prevention program for Minneapolis residents in four community clinics and one community organization.

Under the guidance of a trained coach over 16 weeks, participants learn healthy eating, physical activity, managing stress, staying motivated, and solving problems that can get in the way of making healthy changes.

New classes are forming now. For more information, people can go to www.minneapolismn.gov/health/living/diabetesor call a class provider directly:

  • Native American Community Clinic (Brian Joyce at 612-872-8086 x1041).
  • Hennepin County Medical Center (Pa Xiong at 612-873-6641).
  • Neighborhood HealthSource clinics (Julie Lor at 612-287-2447).
  • Stairstep Foundation (Sylvia Amos at 612-521-3110).

For more information about the National Diabetes Prevention Program, go to www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/index.htm.  Credits belong to the rightful owner.