Check out the Asian Smokers’ Quitline during Lunar New Year Celebration

Prepare to Celebrate the Year of the Dog

The first day of Lunar New Year is on Feb 16, 2018 and it’s fast approaching! ASQ would like to wish everyone will have a fresh start in the year of the do

Getting ready for the new year

Some of the Asian community members may be busy with getting ready for the Lunar New Year and thinking about a resolution for the year of the dog, ASQ has prepared a pack of lucky red envelopes which will be given to each caller who calls ASQ to inquire quit smoking materials or to complete an online enrollment to receive quit smoking service. Red symbolizes good fortune in Chinese and Vietnamese cultures, that is why red envelopes are widely used during Lunar New Year and other celebratory events.

To celebrate the year of the dog and to wish everyone will have a healthy start of the New Year, these red envelopes are given out to Chinese and Vietnamese callers from now till Feb 20. While supplies last!

Help Smokers Quit

You can assist community members or patients to make a quit attempt by making direct referrals via ASQ web-based referral website or assist them to fill out an online enrollment form by going to one of the in language forms below:

Chinese
Korean
Vietnamese

Mental Well-being Matters

Mental well-being is about your quality of life: realizing your abilities, dealing with day to day stress, have meaningful relationships, working and contributing to family and community.

About 80% of us struggle with mental wellbeing at some point, whether we have a mental illness or not. Common challenges and signs include: ▪ Lack of a sense of purpose ▪ Regularly stressed from daily pressures ▪ Lack of a good social support system ▪ Lack of housing or employment ▪ Experiencing social exclusion

Life Implications Poor mental well-being is linked with higher rates of: ▪ Injury ▪ Disability ▪ Chronic disease ▪ Job productivity ▪ Criminal justice involvement ▪ Life expectancy ▪ Lifetime Mental Illness

 

Culturally Important For groups that have experienced oppression, moving toward optimal mental well-being is an important goal. This struggle is fueled by historical and current collective trauma and injustice, which must be addressed to achieve mental well-being.

Tools and Tips

  • Develop relationships with people who are caring, supportive, emotionally healthy and safe. This is critical at every stage of life. Join a group. Get your child a mentor. Invest in your friendships.
  • Develop skills to manage stress and to engage in your world. Learn about your unique strengths and passions. Use them! Volunteer. Develop a gratitude practice, guided imagery, mindfulness, yoga, or other centering activity. 
  • Find hope and connection often found through community, culture, and faith is powerful. Cultivate connections that are important to you.
  • Connect with nature to reduce stress and improve attention. Walk outside. Play outside. Protect and expand green spaces near your home, daycare, and work.
  • Sleep, exercise, and eat healthy Good choices for overall health also matters for mental well-being. Our bodies and brains are connected; our physical and mental well-being are linked.
  • Organize Get active in your community. Almost every government and business decision impacts our mental well-being. Decisions can influence inclusion or availability of key mental well-being ingredients. While you’re at it, you will build and model self-determination and self-efficacy, key social and emotional health skills.

For more mental well-being resources go to MN Dept. of Health’s Mental Health Promotions (https://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/t opic/mentalhealth/).

Minnesota Increasingly Multilingual

image by MPR News

It’s not hard to notice, especially in the Twin Cities area, of all the different languages we hear, at work, at school, out shopping, on public transits. Even in some rural areas, that has also become more common.

With the different languages, it is also not hard to imagine the different clothing, different cultures, different cuisines, etc., that come along with the people that speak the languages.

MPR files a report on how a family navigates in a bicultural world…

https://www.mprnews.org/story/2017/12/07/census-shows-minnesota-increasingly-multilingual

 

Minnesota


Image belongs to rightful owner

Searching the internet for the best and most exciting news and events in our community left me feeling very sad. With multiple tabs opened of websites from different local news reporting sources, all I could find were the negatives. Majority of the news that popped up were the major reports that involved the whole country or the really big negative events in Minnesota. There weren’t much recognition to the positive things happening in our community. Reading about so many things happening made me feel many different emotions; sad, mad, scared, helpless, etc. I had to search else where for community news and events that showed the exciting and fun community Minnesota also has, other than all of the bad that does occur in other states too.

Realizing that even though I was overwhelmed with negative emotions, this was something to learn from. From all of the sad and negative news, we should definitely be aware and keep at the back of our mind to be prepared and safe from danger. Also, just because all we see may be negative things, that doesn’t mean there is no positivity or light at all.

Overall, negative news and what is happening right now is definitely something to keep up with so we can be aware. I am not trying to say that we need less negative news; in the end, it would just be nicer to also have more reports on the positive local community. For example, North Minneapolis has so many businesses, organizations, stores, and people trying to make it a better place for everyone. They offer so many opportunities to their local neighbors and even outsiders. I was able to have the opportunity to walk around the Northside and interview a couple of businesses and organizations. There are so many good things happening but no one really talks about them.

Minnesota is so vibrant and has such a great sense of community connection wherever you go. The diversity, community, nature, food, nightlife, families, etc. There are so many things to look forward to in Minnesota and I’m so thankful to be able to call it my home. I feel like we have to remember to look for the positive things and not let the negatives take over completely. Be aware and know but also spread positivity.  

A Reminder To Be One With The Community

After reading the article titled “The Center for Native and Pacific Health Disparities Research Walks Beside, Not In Front of, Diverse Hawaiian Communities to Control Diabetes,” it made me think about the good point that Dr. Marjorie Mau, a lead principal investigator of the Center for Native and Pacific Health Disparities Research, addressed on how they walk beside the community rather than in front of them. When trying to help the community, I think that it is best to make them feel like family; to feel comfortable and at ease with you. With the information we get about health issues in our communities, it definitely makes us want to address it and help those who may need some guidance. With this, we have to also remember that we can not just try to budge into their lives and take over, even if it is for good intentions.

The article mentioned how the Partnership for Improving Lifestyle Interventions (PILI) project addressed obesity by adapting an existing weight loss education program. They used local languages and examples that were relevant to those in the community. There was also a program added to help participants with the support of family members and the community; this program was culturally adapted based on its community. Personally, I have never thought about letting myself be apart of a research. The whole concept of trying to improve health by researching is amazing but when I think about allowing research programs work on my body, it just doesn’t sound too pleasing, depending on what it is. So after reading this article, I realized that maybe it isn’t too bad. Also, I loved how the research program approached the topic of research and what they were focusing on. Without a doubt, I think that their approach/idea on research and community can be applied to other things.

Dr. Mau and the Center for Native and Pacific Health Disparities Research definitely has good intentions to help the communities, mainly focused in Hawaii. The overall thought of walking besides them/the community and helping with issues they/the community care about can definitely help with the factor of gaining trust and opening up for help/guidance. Since our goal for the concept of Bicultural Healthy Living is to help support people in living healthily within cultures people adapt to, applying these ideas and strategies will greatly benefit the community and our goal.

Remember to lend out a helping hand but also remember to think about who those you help are as a person. Diversity is all around us but sometimes we forget that we live in a world where every culture is different but it is normal. Every community may be different so it is important to help with things that matter to them while making them feel like family.

 

 

To read more about the article, “The Center for Native and Pacific Health Disparities Research Walks Beside, Not In Front of, Diverse Hawaiian Communities to Control Diabetes,” click the link: https://www.nimhd.nih.gov/news-events/features/community-health/diabetes-risk-and-native-hawaiians.html

Be Active!

Asian Media Access is celebrating the many health benefits of outdoor parks and recreation activities in honor of July’s National Park and Recreation Month. National Park and Recreation Month highlights the important role local parks and recreation activities play in keeping our community(ies) strong and healthy. During the month of July we encourage people of all ages to get active outdoors!

Children with access to safe parks are more likely to be physically active — and active kids perform better in school. For people of all ages, physical activity can reduce the chances of becoming obese. Plus, spending time outdoors can improve mental health. Visit Discover the Forest, https://www.discovertheforest.org/?m=1, to search for a forest or park near you!

Keep up with our Facebook page, Bicultural Active Living Lifestyle, to stay updated on some of the latest events in the Minneapolis/Saint Paul Community. Also check out our Bicultural Active Living Lifestyle (BALL) webpage, http://ballequity.amamedia.org/, for more events and coverage. Together we can get our community(ies) to all the great programs that our public parks and recreational facilities offer.

For more information on our events or just more about us,
email us at amamedia@amamedia.org
or call us at (612)376-7715

Shedding a Tear

Having a couple of days off and building up the adventures to the awesome fireworks on the 4th has been amazing. Spending my weekend in Duluth, MN, I saw and realized a lot of things. People everywhere were in a very good mood and everyone was just so happy. This feeling that I was getting reminded me of how proud I am to be an American. There have been many things happening that has been hurting how I felt, about who I am and as an American. Being Asian American, a person of color, there were times when I felt like I did not belong, even though I was born in this country. I have many hopes for my country because I know it’s an amazing place. Times are hard but on the 4th of July, looking around and enjoying everyones’ smile and laughter, it made me feel at peace and very thankful.

            Happy and thankful, I remember why people love this place. The freedom and opportunities we can get here, it gives people hope. Despite all that has been happening, everyone still got together to celebrate Independence Day in America. The multiple fairs across the country just shows how much we all do love this place.

As fire works fly across the skies of America,

we watched in awe, as I shed a tear.