Food Safety


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It is that time of the year again! Summer has finally arrived! It is time for outdoorsy fun with the ones you love. This also means continuing being safe wherever you go and in whatever you do. This week’s post will be on some safety facts about grilling, from the Minnesota Department of Health.

Handle Food Safely

  • Always wash your hands before and after handling food.
  • Keep the kitchen, dishes and utensils clean.
  • Always serve food on clean plates.
  • Harmful bacteria present in raw meat and poultry and their juices can contaminate safely cooked food. To prevent food borne illness, don’t use the same platter and utensils for raw and cooked meat/poultry.

Keep Hot Foods HOT, Cold Foods COLD

  • Keep meat and poultry refrigerated until ready to use.
  • After cooking meat and poultry on the grill, keep it at 140°F or warmer until served. Keep cooked meats hot by setting them to the side of the grill rack. Cooked meat can be kept hot in a warm oven (approximately 200°F), in a chafing dish, or on a warming tray.
  • In hot weather (above 90°F), food should never sit out for more than one hour.
  • Refrigerate any leftovers promptly in shallow containers.

Marinating

  • Marinate to tenderize or add flavor.
  • Marinate food in the refrigerator, not on the counter.
  • If marinades are to be used as a sauce for the cooked meat, either reserve a portion of the marinade before putting raw meat and poultry in it, or boil it before using on cooked meat to destroy any harmful bacteria.

Precooking
Precooking food on a stove is a good way to reduce grilling time. Make sure that the food goes immediately on the preheated grill to complete cooking.

Cook Thoroughly
Fresh and frozen raw meat, poultry and fish should be cooked hot enough to kill the bacteria, parasites and viruses that may be in the product. The temperatures shown below are recommended for home preparation of food. Always use a meat thermometer to check temperatures. Color is not a reliable indicator of doneness.

Reheating
When reheating fully cooked meats, grill to 165°F.

 

FOOD SAFE INTERNAL TEMPERATURE *
Poultry or fowl, whole or parts 165°F
Ground poultry or fowl 165°F
Ground beef, veal, pork, lamb or venison 160°F
Fresh beef, veal, pork, lamb or venison 145°F
Fish and shellfish, all kinds 145°F
Eggs Until yolk and white are firm
Egg dishes 160°F

* Regulated facilities may cook to different temperatures because staff are trained in the use of time and temperature to reach safe standards.

 

For additional information on food safety, visit the link listed

http://www.health.state.mn.us/foodsafety/index.html

 

 

Information received from the Minnesota Health Department. To view the PDF, click on the link provided below.
http://www.health.state.mn.us/foodsafety/cook/grill.pdf

Trends in Obesity Among Early Age Children

CDC

Obesity is a present health concern in the US and it’s important that it is continued to be discussed about. In order to prevent and decrease obesity rates in the US, there have been many attempts and programs to help people better understand what causes obesity, how to prevent it, and the ways we can educate people on it.

Some quick facts from a research conducted by CDC:

“Childhood obesity is associated with negative health consequences in childhood (1) that continue into adulthood (2), putting adults at risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain cancers (1). Obesity disproportionately affects children from low-income families (3).

Overall obesity prevalence increased from 14.0% in 2000 to 15.5% in 2004 and 15.9% in 2010, and then decreased to 14.5% in 2014. During 2010–2014, the prevalence of obesity decreased significantly overall, among non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, American Indian/Alaska Natives and Asians/Pacific Islanders, and among 34 (61%) of the 56 WIC state agencies in states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories.” – CDC

Who is generally at risk for obesity:

  • Low-income families
  • Young mothers
  • People without access to healthy food/alternative food options

What can we do to prevent obesity?

  • Spread the knowledge of obesity among friends, families, peers, co-workers, etc. through various use of communications and social media platforms
  • Encourage people to live a active, balance, and healthier lifestyle by:
    • Encouraging healthy habits
    • Participating in activities outside of home/schools/work environment
    • Buying produces at local markets/groceries or partaking in a community garden or growing your own produces
    • Using other methods of transportation such as walking, biking, skating, etc.

Find recommended resources for minorities here.

Postcard Highlights for August | 2016

This month’s postcards are focused on nature and self-reflection. Remember that one’s perspective determines how they see and fell about things. It’s up to you to decide the positives and negatives in your life. Also, it’s good to be reminded that enjoying the simple things over extravagant luxuries could be more self-fulfilling. It could be spending more time with loved ones, going out to your community, or trying something new.

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Road traffic noise linked to heightened risk of midriff bulge

Recent research indicated that noise from traffic, airplanes, and trains could be responsible for expanding waistlines.

According to the research result, there was an association between road traffic noise and waist size, with a 0.21 cm increase for every additional 5 dB increase in exposure, although this was only significant among women.

At the same point, there was a link to waist:hip ratio, with a change of 0.16 for every 5 dB increase in noise exposure to road, this is specifically for men.

In addition, when people were exposed to more noise pollution at the same time, they had higher possibility to get central obesity.

However, socioeconomic factors, and lifestyle do not affect the findings, age is a critical factor. Those who are below the age of 60 are found the connection between central obesity and road traffic noise.

TIPS for preventing from traffic noise:

Barrier Wall: Construct a barrier wall between your home and the source of the traffic noise.

Buildings: consider putting up buildings to block the traffic noise place a garage, a storage shed.

Water feature: water features do not reduce traffic noise, but they provide a more pleasant background sound, helping to mask it.

Hedges: hedges are not dense enough to combat loud road noise on their own.

SOURCE for help:

Trafficnoise.org: Road Noise Impact Control

 

Teenager pregnancy awareness

Wednesday, May 6, will mark the 14th annual National Day to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. It is organized and overseen by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unintended Pregnancy, the National Day is supported by almost 200 organizational partners; in 2013, almost 500,000 individuals participated.

The rate of teenager pregnancy among AAPI population is much higher than national level in the United States. Therefore, it is important to get our attention on teenager pregnancy issue.

Tips to prevent teenage pregnancy:

1. Be clear about your own sexual value

2. Talk with your children early and often about sex and be specific

3. supervises and monitors your children and adolscents

4. Know your children’s friends and families

5. Discourage early, frequent and steady dating

6. Take a stand against your daughter dating a boy significantly older

7. Help your children have more attractive options for the future than early pregnancy and parenthood

8. Let your children know you value education highly

9. Know what your children are watching, listening to and reading

10. Have a closer relationship with your children at an early age

Additional resources for teenage pregnancy help:

Everyday Miracles

www.everyday-miracles.org/

612-353-6293

FamilyWise Services (formerly Genesis II for Families)

www.familywiseservices.org/

612-617-0191

Heling Us Grow (HUG)

763-504-4983

Hennepin County Child Care Assistance

612-348-5937

Hennepin County Child & Teen Checkups

612-348-5131

 

 

Flu Season

What Is Flu Season?

Flu season is the time of year when the flu virus is most common. Flu season usually begins when cold weather appears. It’s simply a characteristic of the flu and the time of the seasons.

Outbreaks of the flu occur in different seasonal patterns around the world. In temperate climate zones, flu season will typically begin in the late fall and peak in mid-to-late winter.

Flu Season in the United States

Annual outbreaks of seasonal usually occur during the fall through early spring. In a typical year, approximately 5 to 20 percent of the population gets the seasonal flu. Flu-related deaths range from 3.000 to 48,600 (average 23,600). A seasonal flu vaccine is available.

The overall health impact of the flu varies from year to year. Unfortunately, rates of infection, hospitalizations, and deaths can’t be predicted, but by identifying flu symptoms, and knowing about flu treatment and flu prevention options, you cna be better prepared to face the flu season.

Is It Flu?

Flu Symptoms

Flu symptoms can be mild or severe, and can come on suddenly-be sure you know your flu treatment options so you can be prepared. Symptoms generally appear 1 to 4 days after exposure to the virus.

If you have one or more of the symptoms, you could have the flu.

Flu  Prevention Tips

Don’t have the flu and don’t want to get it? Here some some health habits you can work into your life to minimize the chances of getting the flu.

Wash your hands

The flu virus can spread by direct contact, such as sharing drinks, or through indirect contact, such as when an infected coworker sneezes on her hands, and touches an object like the lunchroom microwave door. The influenza virus can live for 2 to 8 hours on surfaces. During flu season, everyone should wash their hands frequently to reduce the risk of transmitting germs to others.

Wash your hands to prevent flu

Cover your sneezes and coughs

When you sneeze or cough, cover your nose and mouth with a tissue (not your hands), and be sure to throw the tissue away immediately.

You can also cough into your sleeve if you don’t have a tissue handy. Hand sanitizers can also help. Try to avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth to keep germs away.

 

Quality of calories

 

 

Once you have learned your calories consumption every day, you may begin to notice your decreased weight, but it is only the beginning step of right step.

As the picture shows, the fuel produced to your body by 2000 calories of gingerbread cookies is not as same as 2000 calories of meat, vegetable, and fruit.

Your body digests different types of nutrients differently. There  are basic bodily functions of all sorts of nutrients: building muscle, transporting nutrients, storing energy as fat for later use, fueling various muscle. Below are how a person compose a basic meal:

Protein: When you exercise, your muscles are broken down and then use protein to rebuild themselves stronger while recovering. Protein absolutely NEEDS to be a main component of every meal.  Aim for one gram per pound (two grams per KG) of lean body weight, or just do one gram per pound of body weight if you don’t want to do the math – with an upper limit of 200 grams.  Sources of protein include chicken, eggs, beef, pork, fish, nuts, legumes, quinoa, and most dairy products.

Carbohydrates: When you eat carbohydrates, they get converted to glucose (sugar) in your system, which is then used to provide energy for all sorts of body functions to take place.  Vegetables and/or fresh fruit are quality sources of carbohydrates, with grains being less so in my opinion…but we’ll get to more grains later. There are certainly bad carbohydrates (processed carbs, refined grains, and more), and those are the ones we want to avoid.  Unless you’re a marathon runner, you can function with WAY less carbs than you’re probably consuming now.

Fat:  Fat is easily the most misunderstood macro-nutrient in your diet; long story short: fat is absolutely critical to your body and should make up a BIG portion of your daily calories.  Things like avocados, almonds, olive oil, walnuts, and almond butter are great sources of healthy fat (polyunsaturatured and monounsaturated).  If you would like to take saturated fat, then full fat milk, coconut milk, and fatty cuts of meat will provide you with sources of saturated fat.