Simple Tips to Be Happier!

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Life can be stressful sometimes where we forget take care of our mind and body. It’s important to always take some time to slow and process what we are going through; whether it is good or bad things. Here are some tips on how you can be happier:

  • Worry less, start doing more! The first steps to do anything is always a challenge, especially if it is out of our comfort zone. Make a list of steps or mini goals to reach your ultimate goal. Try to follow through with by making small actions every day to help you start doing more.
  • Chill your mind! Overthinking won’t do you any good if you don’t break things down into simpler thoughts and see the bigger picture. Whatever that is bothering, ask yourself these questions:
    • How important is it? Is it affecting you in a positive or negative way?
    • Would you prefer talking to somebody about it? If not, writing it down? Put ideas and thoughts onto tangible things if it helps you declutter your thoughts.
  • Exercise can help! Exercise has been studied and shown that it helps reduce stress in your body. Not only is it good to keep up a exercise routine, it also help with your mental health by releasing happy brain chemicals that makes you feel better. After a work out, you’ll feel a lot better than you did before.
  • You’re not in it alone! Tons of people are probably going through similar problems or challenges as you. Take the time to reach out to your social network and resources. Don’t forget that you are not alone and there are always people are willing to be a help and listening pal.

Talking to Teens About Alcohol

It’s important to discuss about the topic of alcohol usage and influences among teens. Whether it may be from their parents, schools, peers, friends, and so on. It’s matter of helping teenagers to develop better decision skills and to make decisions based on what they want. Why do we care? Because we want teens to know the risks of early alcohol use and how it can affect them.

So what are some reasons why teens drink?

  • Social events and social peer pressure
  • Mental, behavior, school, and/or problems at home
  • History of abuse or trauma

What are the consequences of early drinking?

  • Possibility of increased related problems
  • Alcohol-related accidents
  • Higher risk of engaging in:
    • Sexual activity
    • Violent Crime
    • Alcoholism

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March is National Nutrition Month

National Nutrition Month® is a nutrition education and information campaign created annually in March by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The campaign focuses on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits. In addition, National Nutrition Month® promotes the Academy and its members to the public and the media as the most valuable and credible source of timely, scientifically-based food and nutrition information.

http://www.eatright.org/

History

Initiated in March 1973 as a week-long event, “National Nutrition Week” became a month-long observance in 1980 in response to growing public interest in nutrition. Read more in the article, “National Nutrition Month: A Brief History.”

Themes of the New Millennium

With the first “National Nutrition Week” in 1973, it was embraced by members of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics as a way to deliver nutrition education messages to the public while promoting the profession of dietetics. In 1980, the week-long celebration expanded to become National Nutrition Month®. Over the years, the theme has reflected trends and culture of the time, but has always remained true to its original purpose: “To increase the public’s awareness of the importance of good nutrition and position Academy members as the authorities in nutrition.”

2000

Food and Fitness: Health for a Lifetime

2009

Eat Right!

2001

Food and Fitness: Build a Healthy Lifestyle

2010

Nutrition From the Ground Up

2002

Start Today for a Healthy Tomorrow

2011

Eat Right with Color

2003

Healthy Eating, Healthy You

2012

Get Your Plate in Shape

2004

Eat Smart — Stay Healthy

2013

Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day

2005

Get a Taste for Nutrition

2014

Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right

2006

Step Up to Nutrition and Health

2015

Bite Into A Healthy Lifestyle

2007

100% Fad Free

2016

Savor the Flavor of Eating Right

2008

Nutrition: It’s a Matter or Fact

Information provided by http://www.eatright.org/.

International Women’s Day

https://www.internationalwomensday.com/

“International Women’s Day celebrates the social, economic, cultural and political achievement of women. Yet progress has slowed in many places across the world, so global action is needed to accelerate gender parity. In 2016 leaders across the world pledged to take action as champions of gender parity – not only for International Women’s Day, but for every day. Groups and individuals also pledged their support.

For International Women’s Day 2017, we’re asking you to #BeBoldForChange.
Call on the masses or call on yourself to help forge a better working world – a more gender inclusive world. Submit your #BeBoldForChange action via the IWD website.” – https://www.internationalwomensday.com/

The goal is to have everyone, of all backgrounds, both men and women to support this day to showcase the world moving towards a positive direction that ensures equality among all women and men. To name a new things that needs change are equality in wages, education, healthcare, and other opportunities that are limited to women. It may not be the biggest concern in the US, but in other parts of the world these things aren’t available to young girls and women. In support of International Women’s Day, let’s highlight some historical female leaders from all around the world.

Lee Tai-Young was the first official female judge and lawyer in Korea.

Miriam Makeba was a South African leader, singer, actress, and civil rights activist.

Rukmini Devi Arundale was a choreographer, animal activist, dancer, and pioneer of traditional dancing.

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Trends in Obesity Among Early Age Children

CDC

Obesity is a present health concern in the US and it’s important that it is continued to be discussed about. In order to prevent and decrease obesity rates in the US, there have been many attempts and programs to help people better understand what causes obesity, how to prevent it, and the ways we can educate people on it.

Some quick facts from a research conducted by CDC:

“Childhood obesity is associated with negative health consequences in childhood (1) that continue into adulthood (2), putting adults at risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain cancers (1). Obesity disproportionately affects children from low-income families (3).

Overall obesity prevalence increased from 14.0% in 2000 to 15.5% in 2004 and 15.9% in 2010, and then decreased to 14.5% in 2014. During 2010–2014, the prevalence of obesity decreased significantly overall, among non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, American Indian/Alaska Natives and Asians/Pacific Islanders, and among 34 (61%) of the 56 WIC state agencies in states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories.” – CDC

Who is generally at risk for obesity:

  • Low-income families
  • Young mothers
  • People without access to healthy food/alternative food options

What can we do to prevent obesity?

  • Spread the knowledge of obesity among friends, families, peers, co-workers, etc. through various use of communications and social media platforms
  • Encourage people to live a active, balance, and healthier lifestyle by:
    • Encouraging healthy habits
    • Participating in activities outside of home/schools/work environment
    • Buying produces at local markets/groceries or partaking in a community garden or growing your own produces
    • Using other methods of transportation such as walking, biking, skating, etc.

Find recommended resources for minorities here.

Community Efforts Towards Healthier Living

“Community efforts across the country are improving the health of more people by working with groups that include public health professionals, hospitals, local community members, and more.

By Nolan Ly

A lack of access to healthy living opportunities in communities can affect obesity and other preventable chronic diseases. Learn more about community efforts to support healthy eating and active living: http://bit.ly/2knQTvl” – https://www.cdc.gov/

What are the benefits to a active community?

  • Reduce pollution and trash to the environment
  • Provide social and economic opportunities for the people of the community to collaborate and develop better relationships
  • Support social cohesion, events, and activities

What can you do to take part:

  • Going out to explore and enjoy the community by walking, biking, via other outdoor activities etc., either with yourself, friends, or family members.
  • Volunteering at a community garden to help grow veggies/fruits for the community and learning more about gardening along the way.
  • Educate your family, friends, and yourself on recycling, the benefits to it, and how it’s a little step towards making the Earth cleaner.
  • Volunteer for local parks and recreation centers to support and spread awareness for environmental concerns.